All times are Malaysian Standard Time (MST)

GLoCALL 2021: Presentation schedule
Dec 16th
(Thu)
Dec 17th
(Fri)
Dec 18th
(Sat)
Virtual
Presentations
Dec 16th (Thu)
09: 00 - 10: 0060 mins
09: 00 - 10: 0060 mins
Stream 1
101-WDeborah Healey
Keynote speechWorkshop (60 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Teachers have long used text-based stories in language classes to build reading and writing skills, and video-based stories for listening. Digital storytelling moves creating and sharing stories in the digital arena. Like classroom oral storytelling, digital stories build oral and listening skills. Going further, the electronic format allows learners to improve their written communication skills for the digital, multi-modal age. This is not the same as writing a story on paper; the digital form offers the ability to integrate and remix audio and video, and also potentially far wider distribution of the learners’ work. Clearly, creating these stories builds 21st Century skills of creativity and communication. This talk will show examples of digital storytelling, provide a framework for creating digital stories, and encourage teachers to work in small groups to find ways to incorporate digital storytelling into their own classes.
10: 10 - 11: 1060 mins
10: 10 - 11: 1060 mins
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102-WThomas Robb
Keynote speechWorkshop (60 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Dr. Paul Nation, of the University of Victoria at Wellington has proposed a model for language instruction called the "Four Strands". He proposes that for any aspect of language learning, be it reading, writing, listening or speaking,4 kinds of foci are needed,1) "Meaning focused input",2) "Meaning focused output",3) "Fluency Practice" and 4) "Language Focused Learning". He asserts that each skill that is to be learnt should include 25% of each kind of activity. The problem is that in in-class learning, and most likely on-line learning as well, the "Language Focused Learning" aspect comprises most of the activities that teachers require of students. This is traditional "study" while the other three strands comprise practice. In other words, we are feeding them knowledge but providing them with few opportunities to practice what they are studying. This workshop will examine some common technology-based activities that the teacher might assign for each skill and how they might work as a practice activity rather than one that is purely for language-focused learning.
11: 20 - 12: 2060 mins
11: 20 - 12: 2060 mins
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103-WGordon Bateson
Keynote speechWorkshop (60 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
In this workshop, participants will learn how to build an online tool that can automatically assess an individual’s ability to read, write, listen and speak in English. The tool will be created with the Moodle learning management system (LMS). At the beginning of the workshop, participants will be introduced to Moodle and guided how to build an online course. The presenter will also explain how to create and import images, audio, and video into Moodle. Within the Moodle question bank, students will create questions to test reading, listening, writing and speaking ability. These questions will then be added to a Moodle Quiz activity, which forms the basis of a 4-skills test. Finally, participants will try out each other’s quizzes and consider the advantages and disadvantages of this method of assessment.
Dec 17th (Fri)
09: 00 - 09: 5555 mins
09: 00 - 09: 5555 mins
Day 2: Opening ceremony
201-E
Ceremonial event
The conference will be officially declared open by local dignitaries and distinguished guests.
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10:00 - 10:2525 mins
10:00 - 10:2525 mins
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202-PJasmin Cowin
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Training language teachers in e-learning environments
Post-pandemic, teacher education programs across the globe are searching for alternative pathways addressing practicum and fieldwork completion for teacher candidates. Simulation-based learning (SBL) with emotionally intelligent student avatars no longer seems a futuristic endeavor. Organizations focusing on medicine, nursing education, aviation, corporate work safety training, and the military have used simulations for years, enabling trainees to make decisions based on best industry standards through practice in virtual environments. With the growing diverse population in US schools, it is essential for Teaching English as a Second Language (TESOL) teachers to practice incorporation of culturally responsive pedagogy and providing a safe environment for English Language Learners (ELLs). This presentation focuses on reviewing, contrasting, and framing two different virtual training environments for TESOL educators searching for additional opportunities to offer interactive field and practicum experiences: simSchool and Mursion. The presentation and paper will identify, illustrate, and interpret practice-based teacher education (PBTE) and SBL. PBTE illustrates high-level teaching practices, with a specific focus on situated context of use. A PBTE model in SBL can engage TESOL teacher candidates in task-based approaches and help candidates to solidify their knowledge of the distinctions between teaching approaches, methods and techniques.
10:00 - 10:5555 mins
Stream 2
203-WJeremy Robinson et al.
Individual sessionWorkshop (60 minutes)
Brown and Lee in Teaching by Principles share various language learning principles including: Automaticity, Transfer, Reward, Self-Regulation, Identity and Investment, Interaction, Languaculture, and Agency. This workshop will discuss these principles, and how games can be successfully designed to integrate one or more of these. It will also discuss the general benefits of game-based learning. Katakana Fighter is a free educational video game, currently in development, designed to help students with production and reception skills of the Japanese writing system of Katakana, increase Katakana reading speed, and increase general familiarity of Japanese vocabulary. As a part of this workshop, current progress on the game will be showcased, along with an exploration of the design and development process, and how certain principles of language learning are being utilized. The workshop will give an overview and explanation of the Expanded DPA Framework for Game Design (Brian M. Winn) and will then guide participants in the first steps of designing their own educational game for possible development in the future.
10:00 - 10:2525 mins
Stream 3
10:00 - 10:2525 mins
Stream 4
204-PGurnam Kaur Sidhu et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Fostering autonomous learning through technology
The COVID-19 Pandemic triggered the global shift in terms of how education is delivered at all levels including postgraduate study. Overnight, everyone had to embrace online technology driven learning solutions. This paper will discuss an initiative put forward by a private university in Malaysia to help foster autonomous learning among their postgraduate students via the online Pedagogy-Andragogy and Heutagogy (PAH) Continuum whereby learners are taken from full dependence to independence via Open and Distance Learning (ODL). It was enhanced by Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) in both synchronous and asynchronous settings involving the use of video conference platforms, learning management system (LMS) and instant messaging platforms. This quasi-experimental study was conducted with 50 postgraduate students to enhance their competencies in critical reading, academic writing, and research skills. Data for the study were collected via a three-pronged approach involving tests, questionnaires, and semi-structured interviews. Findings revealed positive results in enhancing students’ competencies in reading and research skills, but academic writing skills left much to be desired. Success in full autonomy was hindered for some students due to personal and cultural factors. The paper will also share the implications of the findings and recommendations for further enhancement of the initiative.
10:00 - 10:2525 mins
Stream 5
205-PFrankie Subon
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) pandemic since March 2020 has led to the closing of all educational institutions worldwide. Consequently, e-learning becomes a very popular mode of delivery utilised by all educational institutions to conduct virtual teaching and learning activities. This descriptive study aimed to identify university students’ perceptions on the benefits and barriers of utilising e-learning in teaching and learning during the Covid-19 pandemic. The respondents were selected using convenient sampling and a total of 250 respondents of ESL undergraduates from a private university in Selangor, Malaysia participated in this study. The data were collected using a questionnaire and analysed quantitatively. The results revealed that the learners had positive perceptions towards the ulitisation of e-learning in teaching and learning. They perceived that they had gained many benefits despite facing some barriers when utilising e-learning in teaching and learning during the Covid-19 pandemic. Some pertinent implications were generated from the findings and recommendations for future research were proposed.
10:30 - 10:5525 mins
10:30 - 10:5525 mins
Stream 1
206-PAzlin Zaiti Zainal, Ma Fei Fan
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
This study aims to investigate the processes of learners’ collaborative writing using Google Docs and their perceptions of the collaborative process. Twenty-four undergraduate ESL learners undertaking an academic writing course participated in this study. They were tasked with a paired writing assignment as part of the coursework. Google Docs was used by each pair in revising their drafts before they submitted the final version of their academic essay. Adopting a mixed-methods approach, the qualitative phase involved conducting a textual analysis based on the drafts that the students prepared. The categories used to analyse the revisions were adapted from Kessler, Bikowski and Boggs (2012) analytical categories to understand the focus of learners’ revisions. Students’ responses to an online survey administered at the end of the course formed the quantitative data. The findings provide insights into the processes of collaborative online writing and students’ perceived usefulness of Google Docs as a tool for collaboration. The implications on the design of online writing tasks will be discussed.
10:30 - 10:5525 mins
Stream 3
207-PTien Mai et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Training language teachers in e-learning environments
Covid-19 variants have shaken the landscape of Vietnam’s K-12 systems. The country has to enforce extended lockdown and implement emergency remote teaching and learning (ERT) in most areas during the first semester of the 2021-2022 academic year. To support public school teachers’ digital responses, the research team designed and delivered a 20-hour free online course entitled ‘Tech Menu for ERT Techniques and Tools: A Survival Combo’ to train two cohorts of primary and secondary school EFL teachers. Utilizing the Action Research cycles, we explored the course impacts on participants’ development of technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) and ERT. The course design was theoretically framed with reference to Open Educational Practices, Flipped Learning, TPACK-in-Action, and Lesson Study models. It involved both self-paced learning and live microteaching sessions. The course evaluation included 24 active participants’ qualitative post-course survey responses and the course instructors’ stimulated recall, illustrating engaged participants’ TPACK change. More importantly, participants who required special computer skills assistance identified the constraints of the course in terms of outcomes, socialization, technical and pedagogical support. Hence, we suggest further revisions of the design and delivery of fully online community courses enhancing teachers’ TPACK and ERT in future cycles.
10:30 - 10:5525 mins
Stream 4
208-PRevati Ramakrishnan et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
Teaching and learning in early childhood education have predominantly been conducted in physical settings. Generally, this has been the norm for early childhood education since young children benefit from concrete materials and experiences. However, due to the ongoing pandemic, countries were compelled to implement online education including for early childhood. As a result of this drastic shift from traditional ways of teaching and learning to online education in early childhood, there is a pertinent need to explore early childhood educators’ experiences in using digital resources for online education. Past studies have highlighted the types of digital resources as well as how these impacted young children’s learning and engagement positively albeit in mostly physical classroom settings (Gillen and Kucirkova,2018; Altun 2018; Van der Westhuizen, Hannaway,2021). The aim of this study is to explore early childhood educators’ perspectives and experiences on the following questions: What were the digital resources used during online teaching & learning? How were the digital resources used during online teaching & learning? How did these digital resources support children’s engagement in online learning? The study employs a qualitative methodology which comprises document analysis of early childhood educators’ written lesson plans and self-reflections.
10:30 - 10:5525 mins
Stream 5
209-PShin Pyng Wong
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Using the Internet for cultural exchange
Mentoring assists the mentors and mentees, who are university students, in their adaptation to the university culture and learning. The Internet is mainly used for cultural exchange and language learning between the university student mentors and mentees from different cultural backgrounds. This study adopted a collective case study design that studied five sets of university student mentors and mentees to provide insights into their processes of cultural exchange and language learning using the Internet. Purposive sampling was applied in which ten university students from University A were invited to participate in the study because they practiced mentoring and represented various academic and personal backgrounds. Five of them were Malaysian students who enrolled in different undergraduate degree programmes at University A, while the other five of them were Korean students from different undergraduate degree programmes in Korean universities, who enrolled in a 4-week summer vacation programme at University A. Interviews were conducted to collect data, in order to unpack the university student mentors and mentees’ gains and struggles in using the Internet for cultural exchange and language learning.
11:00 - 11:2525 mins
11:00 - 11:2525 mins
Stream 1
210-PPing-Yu Huang
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Emerging technologies
In recent years, researchers have attempted to compile academic collocation lists which are assumed to be important to EAP (English for academic purposes) learning. Those lists, however, tend to be criticized for their lower coverage in certain domains (e. g. medicine) than in others (e. g. sociology). In this presentation, our objective is to describe the construction and functions of a web-based tool which is meant to offer EAP learners the collocational knowledge that they actually need. Our tool has been developed based on an innovative corpora-comparison approach, and thus is able to show learners what collocations are frequent EAP usages, and what are particularly important to the learners’ discipline(s) (i. e. ESP or English for specific purposes collocations). Take the discipline of medicine as an example. By automatically processing and comparing the data in several domain-specific corpora, our tool can inform medical students what collocations are general-purpose academic usages (e. g. “statistically significant” and “future research”), and what are technical usages specialized in medical research (e. g. “physical activity” and “adverse event”). In this paper we also discuss tasks that teachers can undertake in classrooms to familiarize their students with both EAP and ESP collocation usages.
11:00 - 11:2525 mins
Stream 2
211-PMeng Huat Chau et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
This paper reports on a collaborative initiative between a US language educator and a Malaysian language educator on blended learning using Garrison’s (2017) Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework. It took place in a postgraduate course at a university in Malaysia which, for many semesters, had been conducted face-to-face with online resources provided in the form of readings and online submission. In an attempt to increase the amount of learning and engagement among students outside of class time, blended learning based on the CoI was introduced in the course. Unlike many articles which report on the ‘success stories’ of certain initiatives, this paper is a reflection of why the CoI practice did not continue in the following semesters, despite the benefits evidenced based on an analysis of the students’ interaction; it also considers the lessons learned. This paper first describes the project, which lasted for one semester. It then reviews some findings based on the three key elements of teaching presence, social presence and cognitive presence. Finally, this paper discusses some lessons learned for a CoI to be sustainable in a course, and argues that learning from ‘failure’ can be as valuable as learning from the past experience of success.
11:00 - 11:2525 mins
Stream 3
212-PTon My Nhat Ton Nu et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Fostering autonomous learning through technology
During the pandemic, some teachers tried to use video conferencing tools such as Zoom, or Google Meet to organize synchronous video meetings with students and present their lessons, but do not sustain asynchronous forum discussions. The study examined the effects of asynchronous forum discussions on the learners’ autonomy and their deep learning. The study employed two groups: the controlled group with optional asynchronous forum discussions and the experimental group with compulsory asynchronous forum discussions about the lessons that students learnt synchronously with their teachers. Participants were 92 undergraduate students studying phonetics and phonology at a university in Vietnam. Findings showed that more students in the compulsory forum discussion group posted their discussions than those in the optional group. In addition, students in the experimental group could develop their deep learning. The findings suggest some pedagogical implications for teachers to sustain students’ deep learning.
11:00 - 11:2525 mins
Stream 4
213-PNurjanah Mohd Jaafar et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
In Malaysia, there are a number of school types at the secondary level: national, vernacular, private and international. This study explored the perceptions of students from these different schools towards their online learning engagement using Fredricks et al. 's (2004) framework of behavioural, cognitive and emotional engagement. In addition to these variables, external support provided to the students will also be considered. To this end, a questionnaire that elicited information about students' online practices and online learning engagement was administered. 768 students from different school types responded to the questionnaire. ANOVAs were carried out to analyse and compare responses of students from these different schools. The paper will present the findings and the implications of the study.
11:00 - 11:2525 mins
Stream 5
214-PNajihah Mahmud et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
In the wake of Covid-19, government all over the world had taken drastic measures to curb the spread of this virus. In Malaysia, Movement Control Order (MCO) was introduced forcing many sectors to stop operation and that includes the education sector. Alternative learning known as PdPR (Home-based Teaching and Learning) for schools was introduced where teachers have to conduct their lessons online to ensure continued education. Parental support was reported to be an important factor to child’s development as they partially carry out the teachers’ duty when at home. Therefore, this study seeks to explore parental involvement in supporting home-based teaching and learning. In this qualitative study, five parents involved in the Jolly Phonics programme were interviewed and observed throughout the entire programme. It was found that some of the parents still relied on the teacher to carry out their duty in teaching. However, most of the parents who volunteered to join the programme showed high interest and were willing to go extra miles to support their children’s learning. It was hoped that the parents will keep the positive attitude so that the teacher’s burden could be reduced.
11: 30 - 12: 2555 mins
11: 30 - 12: 2555 mins
Stream 1
215-KSu Luan Wong
Keynote speechKeynote (55 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
A new generation of students has entered the Malaysian education system. They are media-centric and rely heavily on digital tools to learn and play. These students are known as the 21st century learners. To be successful learners, they must have mastery of three broad skills set comprising learning and innovation skills, digital literacy skills and finally career and life skills. As we progress into a technology-based society, Malaysian educators are expected to be adequately tech-savvy to rise to the challenge of teaching the more digitally-inclined students in the present day classroom. Given the aforesaid scenario, Malaysia's awareness of the need to improve the teaching-learning environment with the integration of ICT is growing and progress is evident in many areas. In this talk, I will share some insights on the latest ICT trends and development in Malaysian schools and higher learning institutions. My talk will conclude by providing a glimpse of some challenges we are facing in the pursuit of nurturing successful 21st century learner.
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12:30 - 12:5525 mins
12:30 - 12:5525 mins
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216-PPeter Gobel
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
The past year has thrust most Japanese language students, educators, and institutions into the arena of online learning. Some were eager and willing to explore this change, with others less so. Although most teachers are accustomed to using digital technology in their daily lives, for many, transferring these skills to online language learning has not been a smooth transition. This was not only true for teachers, but also for institutions. Shifting to online learning platforms may have offered an upside of convenience and flexibility, but the downside was a variety of tech problems and a steep learning curve for many. So, what effect did the forced use of ICT for language teaching have on teachers and administrators, and what are the implications? To what extent is online learning “here to stay”? Using modern frameworks of technology acceptance, and the results of an open-ended survey of 130 respondents at 15 private institutions in Japan, this presentation examines several settings, practices, and strategies to highlight recent changes in ICT use at Japanese universities. The presenter will focus on institutional policy changes regarding class procedures, teacher attitudes towards these changes, and possible scenarios for the future of ICT use in Japanese higher education.
12:30 - 12:5525 mins
Stream 2
217-PSiew Ming Thang et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Localizing Internet materials to the classroom
In the Malaysian context, there are numerous studies that explored young learners’ literacy skills but none that uses the eye-tracking device to track the cognitive processes of prereaders when they are reading picture storybooks. For this project 22 prereaders (4-5 years old) listened to brief stories in four conditions: (a) only static text with narration (text condition), (b) oral narration and a picture that was congruent with the narration (congruent condition), (c) oral narration and an incongruent picture (incongruent condition), and (d) only picture with text but no oral narration (control condition). For the qualitative inquiry, the 22 prereaders were divided into three categories “Good”, “Average”, and “Weak” based on the ratings done by three independent raters on the quality of their storytelling. The patterns of their storytelling will be explored to see how their storytelling are affected by the four conditions and objects specifically mentioned in the stories. These findings will be correlated with the results of their eye movements derived from eye-tracking analysis to enable a better understanding of how the inclusion of pictures facilitates understanding of the narration and influence comprehensive ability. The findings and implications will be shared during the presentation.
12:30 - 12:5525 mins
Stream 3
218-PJennifer Tan
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
This exploratory study focuses on a group of post graduate students in a Malaysian private university who have been studying remotely for almost 2 years since the Covid 19 pandemic began in March 2020. The study has three main aims; firstly to identify the online learning needs of graduate student, secondly to unpack and understand these needs by referring to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs (1943) and thirdly to propose practical means in order to maintain a somewhat similar level of rigor as accustomed to by the students in the physical classroom. Using the qualitative approach,12 post graduate students at various stages of study were provided questions via GoogleDoc which comprised of two parts; their online experiences and their Wishlist as online learners. These questions served as points for critical reflections as they participated in a 2.5 hour long online focus group discussion. Findings showed that while students identified certain basic needs as necessary for successful online teaching and learning, higher level needs such as the physiological and self fulfilment needs were also necessary in order to experience meaningful learning experiences in the online learning space.
12:30 - 12:5525 mins
Stream 4
219-PEunjeong Park
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Training language teachers in e-learning environments
This mixed-methods study explored preservice teachers’ experiences and perceptions of flipped learning in the COVID-19 era. Thirty Korean EFL preservice teachers (the age range is 22-24) participated in survey research; fifteen of them joined the interviews in this study. For data analysis, survey data were analyzed along with descriptive statistics (e. g. , means, standard deviation, and percentage). Then, thematic analysis was used to analyze the interview data. Thematic analysis is useful in exploring recurring themes and patterns in qualitative research. The findings revealed that the preservice teachers deeply considered flipped learning as useful for self-regulation and autonomy. They also discussed the advantages and challenges of flipped learning. In terms of online sessions for previewing, however, they perceived the need for instant feedback from their professor and interactions with their peers. Lastly, the preservice teachers argued that the online sessions before the class should be closely connected to their learning in class. Pedagogical implications are also discussed in this study.
12:30 - 12:5525 mins
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13:00 - 13:2525 mins
13:00 - 13:2525 mins
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220-PLayhuah Goh et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Emerging technologies
The Industrial Revolution 4.0 (IR 4.0) has changed how we live, work, and communicate; it is likely to change the values held by children, and the strength of their values. This research investigated 109 children’s perceptions of the current level of their moral values and compared it with the level of their perceived ideal moral values. The respondents were between the ages of eight to eleven from an international school in Selangor. The study utilized a picture-based values instrument via an online survey. The instrument design was adapted from the Animated Values Instrument (Collins et al. ,2016) and the values content was adapted from the core values in the Malaysia Moral Education framework (Vishalache,2010). Fourteen moral values were included in this research. Examples of the values are respect, honesty, kindness, responsibility and humility, among others. Findings revealed that there was significant difference between the children’s perception of the strength of their current values and that of their perceived ideal of the values. Future research may explore interventions to bridge the gap to enhance the values held by the children so that they can develop into balanced individuals who can better handle the demands of the 21st century.
13:00 - 13:2525 mins
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13:00 - 13:2525 mins
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221-PSook Jhee Yoon
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
The pandemic has changed the landscape of language programs. One of the most notable areas is materials in use. As Bax pointed out that the use of technology in language education is still far from normalisation, there is a need to understand the current state of blended learning practices among language teachers. Focusing on materials in use, this study aimed to unpack the complexities faced by teachers with varying degrees of digital literacies and their capacity on using materials for purposeful learning. Using participatory action research, ethnography, and argument-based approaches, I set out to evaluate five teachers’ capacity in using materials designed for blended language programs in an Australian university. I gathered evidence using interviews, observations, and document analysis for two years. The analysis points to moderate support for the claim that teachers are capable of using materials for blended language programs. This study contributes to a view that focusing on teachers’ capacity in the use of materials may lead to insights into teacher education programs and continuous professional development that is relevant in a world dependent on networked technologies for language learning.
13:00 - 13:5555 mins
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222-WVance Stevens
Individual sessionWorkshop (60 minutes)
This session introduces the concept of #tags and empowers participants to exploit their power in professional and language development. The session presents examples where #tags are used in language learning, and by teachers pursuing professional development; notably by using them effectively at conferences such as this one. There are often delegates attending conferences who use #tags to share content conference-wide with others following the tagged feeds, often in Twitter. The presenter will show participants how they can use #glocall2021 at this conference to share commentary across parallel sessions and create back-channels for discussion throughout the conference. To illustrate, we play a number of “#tag games” to create a set of tagged objects that participants can retrieve instantaneously through techniques learned at the workshop. We then extend our games to show how this can extrapolate to language learning; e. g. a project where teachers around the world had their students blog content online, and then find one another anywhere in the world using the tag #writingmatrix. Through exploration and using the tools to recapture what they have learned, teachers will leave the workshop with a greater understanding of tagging and its possibilities in language learning and in their networked professional development.
13:00 - 13:2525 mins
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13:30 - 13:5525 mins
13:30 - 13:5525 mins
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223-PSeng Thah Soon
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
This survey was undertaken to study the levels of ICT competencies among Malaysian language teachers based on the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) framework. The sample comprised 480 primary and 281 secondary school teachers selected randomly from all states in Malaysia and the questionnaire was administered using web- based placement. The study showed high levels of reliability (alpha > .90) for the four domain constructs. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to determine construct validity and model fit with Goodness-of-Fit Index, Comparative Fit Index and Root Mean Square Error of Approximation estimates indicating good model fit and conceptual basis of the model based on ISTE standards. The findings of the study showed significant differences (p < .05) between primary and secondary school language teachers' ICT competencies in two domains, i. e. technological concepts and operational skills, and social, ethics and security skills. Overall, the level of ICT skills among language teachers differed significantly between primary and secondary schools in Malaysia. The level of ICT skill sets based on the ISTE standards did not differ significantly among language teachers in Malaysia, comprising those teaching Bahasa Malaysia, English language, Chinese, Tamil, Arabic and other languages.
13:30 - 13:5525 mins
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224-PMyung Jeong Ha
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Emerging technologies
This study explores cross-linguistic influence (CLI) and topic effects on the lexical and syntactic complexity in second language (L2) learners’ writing. The present study analyzes a corpus of argumentative essays written by EFL learners of English with the aim to examine changes in syntactic and lexical dimensions of complexity across different topics and L1 backgrounds. The written module of the International Corpus Network of Asian Learners of English (ICNALE) is adopted in this study (Ishikawa,2013). The ICNALE is the corpus of argumentative essays written by college-level Asian learners of English from 10 countries. These essays are analyzed using 10 syntactic complexity measures with the L2 Syntactic Complexity Analyzer (Lu,2010). After the lexical and syntactic complexity indices are obtained, a two-way repeated-measures MANOVA with topic as a within- subjects variable and L1 as a between-subjects variable are conducted. For main and interaction effects with statistical significance, univariate analyses are performed to identify each of the dependent variables (complexity measures) significantly influenced by the predictors. The results of these analyses will be discussed in depth in terms of previous arguments about the relationship of lexical and syntactic complexity in L2 writing to topic effect and L1 backgrounds.
13:30 - 13:5525 mins
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225-PJohn Blake
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Managing multimedia/hypermedia environments
Learners expect online learning platforms not only to provide accurate information but also to be multimodal. Creating high-quality multimodal content to meet learner expectations requires a significant commitment of both effort and time. This study aims to identify the most time-efficient and effective method to produce high-quality video materials. Multiple approaches were adopted in the production of a bank of on-demand explanatory video materials. These approaches are described, compared and evaluated. This presentation focusses on the three phases of production of video explanations by three content creators working individually. The three phases are: pre-production (e. g. script, storyboard and shot list), production (e. g. audio and video recording) and post-production (e. g. editing, background music and subtitling). Both the video creation process and the video artefacts were evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively by the content creators and focus groups. The results of the evaluations will be presented and discussed. Some of the key takeaways from this study are that user feedback showed that the most popular pre-recorded format was animated slideshow. A quality management process, check points and checklist will be detailed. The presentation concludes by sharing the most time-efficient way to create an extensive bank of bilingual textual, audio and video materials.
13:30 - 13:5525 mins
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14: 00 - 14: 5555 mins
14: 00 - 14: 5555 mins
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226-KMark Pegrum
Keynote speechKeynote (55 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
In this plenary, we will explore mobile learning at the intersection of the global and the local, examining it from two distinct angles. Firstly, we will focus on mobile learning in the sense of learning which is appropriate for an ever more mobile and superdiverse world; and secondly, we will focus on mobile learning in the sense of learning which exploits multiple levels of mobility, including the mobility of devices, the mobility of learners, and the mobility of learning experiences. We will go on to look at examples of innovative mobile language and literacy learning projects from around the world, drawing on cases from both the Global North and the Global South. It will be suggested that the most effective forms of mobile learning are contextually appropriate; exploit mobility on as many levels as possible; and, in some of the most pedagogically sophisticated cases, build connections between global and local learning. We will wrap up with some reflections on the need for educators and students to develop the critical mobile literacy to carefully evaluate the use of mobile devices, locally and globally, in education and in society as a whole.
15:00 - 15:2525 mins
15:00 - 15:2525 mins
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227-PYasuko Okada et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Managing multimedia/hypermedia environments
Viewing videos of their own and their peers’ speeches allows learners to reflect on their performance in a target language and to learn from their peers. This pilot study examined how videos helped Japanese learners gain awareness of their and their peers’ performances in speaking Korean to enhance their speaking performance. The participants were ten first-year and six second-year female students learning Korean at a two-year college. The former students gave a short prepared speech about their own experiences, and their performances were recorded to reflect their performances. The latter students gave two prepared speeches, both of which were recorded to compare differences in their performance. To understand the effectiveness of the viewing, an open-ended questionnaire was administered online, and responses were analyzed using mixed methods. The findings revealed that video watching created a positive learning environment for the first-year students, whereas comparing videos at two points contributed to an increase in second-year students’ awareness of their speech. Our results imply that the viewing of student speech videos is beneficial for learners of any language to make their progress visible.
15:00 - 15:2525 mins
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228-PJunjie Gavin Wu
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Emerging technologies
As an emerging technology, virtual reality (VR) is now being used in education, particularly with STEM-related learning. However, as with all pedagogical innovation, there is a lack of empirical research on the application of VR in situations where students are using it with their second language (L2) and existing studies generally rely on the use of non-immersive VR tools. This paper is one step in a process of understanding the affordances and constraints of a fully immersive VR system in facilitating language learning for English as a Foreign Language (EFL) nurses. The results of a small-scale study suggested that learners appreciated the different features of VR, which enhanced the integration of virtuality, reality, and mentality. In addition, mediating factors of this VR learning experience were discussed based on the data set. Informed by the current findings, the paper puts forward suggestions for designing VR-supported language learning, which hopefully sheds some light on the complex nature of the effective use of VR in learning.
15:00 - 15:2525 mins
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229-PSakunthala C.sivapalasanmugam
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
The implementation of e-learning in educational institutions has been escalated by the Covid-19 pandemic which necessitated an almost overnight shift to remote learning. This has posed problems in delivering quantitative modules. Therefore, the students’ acceptance of Excel as an innovative tool to provide illustrations for Accounting was studied using a quantitative approach at a private university in Kuala Lumpur. The five attributes of Roger’s Diffusion of Innovation model were linked with Davis’s Technology Acceptance Model to form the conceptual framework for this study. A validated survey instrument adopted from Moore and Benbasat (1991) was distributed online to students of a private university using a simple random sampling approach. In total,71 students responded and the data was analysed using descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. The results showed that the attributes had a strong positive relationship with the intention to use Excel and the usage behaviour. The findings of the research contributed to an understanding of the perception of undergraduate students regarding the usefulness of Excel in delivering Accounting modules remotely. These results can be generalised to populations with similar characteristics which are pursuing subjects adhering to a structure and curriculum like that of Accounting subjects.
15:00 - 15:2525 mins
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230-PVan Le
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Interactivity is one of the crucial factors contributing to the success in foreign language learning. However, in many countries, online learning is currently being conducted to stop the spread of Covid-19 pandemic. Therefore, it is challenging to maintain adequate interaction between students and teachers or among students. Various platforms have been employed to improve the efficiency of online interaction in the study process such as Zoom, Google Classroom, Microsoft Teams, Skype, Team Link, etc. Among those useful tools, Nearpod has emerged as an all-round solution for online teaching, particularly in English teaching since it can ensure the interactivity among teachers, students and the materials. This research aims to investigate whether Nearpod, a tool aiding online study, increases student’s interactivity in English learning. Two hundred and four freshmen at Van Lang University (VLU), Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, participated in this project for eleven weeks. Mixed-method approach was used together with 2 data collection instruments: Perception of Online Interaction Scale (a Likert questionnaire) and open-ended questions. The results indicate that the use of Nearpod boosts interaction in online English learning. The findings have a significant contribution to facilitating virtual study which is inevitable in the hazardous infection of Covid-19 virus.
15:00 - 15:2525 mins
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15:30 - 15:5525 mins
15:30 - 15:5525 mins
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231-PShana Mat Salleh
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
This study explores the experiences and perceptions of 59 first year university students on flipped learning systems, over the course of one semester. The students carried out three separate sessions of flipped methodology classes, utilising a variety of online tools for teaching and communicating with each other. The types of flipped methodologies used were mixed to accommodate different learning styles. Primarily, the rotation model was used interspersed with the standard inverted classrooms to allow for a more discussion-based conclusion to the sessions. Results indicated that while the students had very little prior knowledge and experience on flipped classroom, they were generally positive in their initial perception of the learning strategy. Furthermore, over the period of the semester, the students fully embraced the entire process albeit with some apprehension regarding their peer’s motivation and efficiency in conducting the flipped sessions. A pre-sessional survey was conducted at the start of the semester as well as post-sessional surveys after each flipped session to gauge any particular changes in the students’ perceptions throughout the study. The overall findings showed positive reception from the students regarding flipped classroom with notable mentions of improved confidence and the development of active learning approaches.
15:30 - 15:5525 mins
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233-PLay Shi Ng
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
The Covid-19 pandemic has raised significant challenges for the higher education community worldwide. A particular challenge has been the urgent and unexpected request for previously face-to-face university courses to be taught online. Online teaching and learning imply a certain pedagogical content knowledge, mainly related to designing and organising for better learning experiences and creating distinctive learning environments, with the help of digital technologies. This study proposes an online learning module that is fully developed by students to promote student-centred learning and learner engagement in online foreign language classes. This module allows students to design virtual tours on different topics based on the course syllabus through an oral presentation by using simple applications and software available online such as Kapwing and Filmora 9. Through this module, students are able to design the learning content for different topics. A focus-group interview was conducted after the implementation of this new learning method at the end of the semester and the findings of the thematic analysis show that the majority were satisfied with this Student-centred learning approach and they were feeling interested and motivated as the oral presentation practice and recording improved their pronunciation and confidence in speaking a foreign language.
15:30 - 15:5525 mins
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234-PKeanwah Lee
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Training language teachers in e-learning environments
This study was designed to examine pre-service teachers’ (PSTs) learning experiences of a year-long TESOL methodology course via a Flipped Classroom (FC) approach. The PSTs (N=18) were required to document their learning experiences via reflective blog entries. The PSTs reflections encompassed the planning, designing, implementing, and evaluating process of their own and their own peers’ learning of the skills, competences and attitudes of a TESOL Methodology course. The qualitative study involved a group of Y3 TESOL Education students (N = 18) who were enrolled in the 2020/2021 session. The data elicitation instruments were (1) students’ reflections in blogs of their learning experiences, and (2) focus group interviews. Data were inductively analysed using thematic analysis with the help of Nvivo software. Findings showed the PSTs critical reflections enhanced the understanding of the learning outcomes of TESOL methodology course. The meta-analysis of the affordances and challenges of the FC approach using the Activity Theory framework raises the PSTs awareness of the need to consider and pay greater attention to the complexities within the bounded system of the subject, object, mediational tools, rules, division of labour and the community involved in the planning, implementation and evaluation of the FC approach.
15:30 - 15:5525 mins
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16: 00 - 16: 2525 mins
16: 00 - 16: 2525 mins
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16: 00 - 16: 2525 mins
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236-PKok Yueh Lee
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
This study investigates students’ perceptions and attitudes on the use of flipped classroom in a higher education institution in Brunei. Twenty-four first year students undertaking Professional Communication module took part in the flipped classroom exercise. Three flipped classroom sessions were conducted over 14 weeks. All students had to study the course materials and do research prior to the classes. A pre-questionnaire was administered at the start of the semester to investigate students’ knowledge towards flipped classroom. Three post-questionnaires were subsequently delivered after each exercise to investigate the students’ experiences with the flipped classroom. Prior to the exercise, majority of the students (93%) have not heard of flipped classroom. All students have used various means of online learning resources although they were somewhat indifferent towards the use of technology as part of their learning. The findings showed that most students expressed positive attitudes towards flipped classroom as it encouraged collaboration, motivation and allowed students to learn at their own pace, promoting independent learning. Whilst it is conclusive the flipped classroom exercise is favourable in the present study, it may not be suitable for all learning or subjects in higher education contexts having to factor in the course contents and learning outcomes.
16: 00 - 16: 2525 mins
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237-PWee Ling Choo, Lee Luan Ng
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
This study explores the effects of online delivery on vocabulary learning strategies (VLSs) and written performance among tertiary ESL learners via Massive Open Online Courseware (MOOC) and video-conferencing. Fifty intermediate ESL learners completed a 5-week vocabulary learning strategies course on a MOOC platform while forty-four students learnt from the instructor synchronously on Microsoft Teams. The VLSs questionnaires administered revealed that there was an increase in the use of vocabulary strategies after the completion of the course for both groups. Prior to and after the 5-week period, each student wrote a total of 4 compositions and were analyzed using Lextutor’s version of RANGE lexical frequency profiling (LFP). The results showed that both groups used a higher percentage of the first 1,000 most frequent words (K1) and fewer words from the 2,000 level (K2), Academic Word List (AWL) and off-list category after the treatment. The findings also revealed that different tasks resulted in differing use of advanced words for the MOOC group, which reflected that the specific word groups of vocabulary used by students were influenced by the tasks. The findings from this study would yield useful insights for ESL instructors and learners who rely on online in recent times.
16: 00 - 16: 2525 mins
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238-PBaiju Thomas
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
The present research shows how utilizing cooperative learning (CL) strategies to support students with intellectual disabilities (SwIDs) in inclusive learning environments boost their capacities. Persons, as well as states, recognize the importance of learning in integration, and therefore, all of the resources are utilized in learning. However, a competing society also has its negative consequences on the learning system. While making connections on the pathway to victory, SwIDs seek to identify linkages with everyone. They are inappropriate since they have no contacts and relationships with other people. Considering numerous attributes of matured personal character is useful for SwIDs. CL is a technique that encourages students to study alongside one another. The current teaching style in inclusive classrooms for SwIDs is tested to discover effective CL practices. When classrooms have a greater mix of students with and without disabilities, CL approaches prove to be more effective for promoting multiple dimensions of learning. This means that it is in the interest of schools and SwIDs to support CL methods because those techniques have proven themselves to be more successful and suitable settings for providing the same. CL taking place engaging together just to create a strategy, and it is this level of togetherness that inspires participants to assist and encourage one another. When learners cooperate they tend to communicate what someone has to offer, provide and receive support, come to a resolution, and overcome stress effectively. CL, including enhanced self-evaluation and accomplishment, has both behavioral and educational implications for SwIDs. The inclusive educational (IE) practices within CL allow students the chance to feel that their voice can be heard and reflected in society. The whole study suggests that persons, who support inclusion as a suitable learning setting for SwIDs, suggest a range of approaches for the preparation of CL as an approach for inclusion, and some propose that CL provides teachers with a technique for creating classroom learning in which skills, knowledge and effective practices are discovered for SwIDs in inclusive classroom settings.
16: 00 - 16: 2525 mins
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16: 30 - 17: 2555 mins
16: 30 - 17: 2555 mins
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239-KDeborah Healey
Keynote speechKeynote (55 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Many if not all of our learners are accustomed to using technology in their own lives. Much has been said about the so-called Generation X, Millennials, and Gen Z, who seem to be constantly connected to their mobile devices, and through their devices, to each other. However, our mobile-aware learners may not be very good at focused learning with technology support. This talk will explore why and how teachers can enhance their own and their students’ 21st Century skills, with a focus on technology use in four major areas: critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and creativity. Realistically speaking, these are now simply life skills for everyone. I will also offer suggestions for technology integration based on TESOL’s new initiative, the 6 Principles for Exemplary Teaching of English Language Learners. The 6 Ps are firmly research-based and useful to any language teacher at any level.
17: 30 - 18: 0030 mins
17: 30 - 18: 0030 mins
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Day 2: PacCALL Annual general meeting (AGM)
240-E
Ceremonial event
All delegates are invited to discuss the past, present nad future of this conferences.
Dec 18th (Sat)
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10:00 - 10:2525 mins
10:00 - 10:5555 mins
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301-WEric Hagley et al.
Individual sessionWorkshop (60 minutes)
Do you want your students to interact with students from other countries? If the answer is “yes” - join this workshop! The phrase "Global community" is used often but experienced by few. The International Virtual Exchange Project (IVEProject) is changing that. Over the last 6 years some 24,000 students from 22 countries interacted online via this project. Students have authentic communication with non-native speakers, negotiate meaning and acquire skills essential to developing better communication. Employers appreciate students with a better understanding of non-native English as this will be the language they will communicate in in the coming century. In this workshop, the project will be outlined and results from research done on participating students presented. The research shows students with low levels of English ability increase their interactional confidence, intercultural sensitivity, knowledge of their own culture, gain motivation to learn English, and are more interested in other cultures after participating. The free-of-charge IVEProject is sponsored by the Japanese government. Participants in this workshop will learn: how they and their students can participate; about recent developments that help teachers and students participate more easily such as the development of the student dashboard, the advanced forum report and the forum metrics.
10:00 - 10:2525 mins
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302-PWarid Mihat et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Past studies suggested that understanding the congruency between readers’ reading behaviours and target reading outcomes is imperative in improving students’ reading proficiency. This research, therefore, aims to evaluate the aligned reading standards through the reading profiles developed based on oculomotor behaviour observations. In an attempt to develop comprehensive reading profiles of basic readers in Malaysia, this research approaches this issue with a new perspective through the eye-mind hypothesis (EMH). Towards this end, eighty 12-year-old participants were identified as basic readers through the Key English Test (KET) and divided systematically into two groups to reflect different reading purposes: 1. expeditious reading group and 2. careful reading group. 3-phase mixed methods evaluation design is employed in the research methodology. The first phase observes participants’ oculomotor behaviours when they read narrative, expository, and infographic texts using an eye tracker Tobi-Pro Glasses 100 Hz. Next, phase two identifies arising themes in phase 1 for reading profiles development. Concurrently, phase two also identifies types of basic readers through cluster analysis and gaze-plot recording observations. Finally, phase three of this study evaluates the aligned reading standards by mapping it to the reading profiles developed earlier. The findings revealed a profile of nine characteristics that describe the basic readers in the Malaysian context: 1. fixation durations per word are similar across different texts,2. do rereading at the micro-level,3. show multidimensional relationship across sentence types,4. skip information and text features,5. make double fixation at short content and function words,6. make desegmentation between sentences,7. influenced by pathological schemata,8. gain benefits from spending longer time processing information, and 9. require exposure towards different reading tasks. This study found three new elements that should be added to the reading standards through the mapping process. These elements include readers being able to navigate on all information in the text, reconfirm their understanding, and read for different purposes.
10:00 - 10:2525 mins
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303-PSharina Silvaraj
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an abrupt shift, forcing universities to switch from physical learning to online learning using e-learning platforms, such as Microsoft Teams. It is vital to explore students’ intention to continue using Microsoft Teams, considering e-learning is the only option for students to continue learning during the pandemic and could be a possible learning option in post-pandemic. A quantitative study was conducted to identify attributes of Microsoft Teams that influence the intention of undergraduate students to continue using it at a private university in Kuala Lumpur. The attributes of Microsoft Teams were developed based on Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovation model. A validated survey instrument adopted from Moore and Bensabat (1991) was used to collect data via an online survey using a simple random sampling method. Descriptive statistics and inferential statistics using regression analysis were used to analyze the data from 71 respondents. Findings from the study showed that the attributes of Microsoft Teams have a fairly moderate influence on undergraduate students’ intention to continue using Microsoft Teams for online learning. Findings from the study contributed to understanding how undergraduate students are leaning toward embracing innovation, such as Microsoft Teams for e-learning.
10:00 - 10:2525 mins
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304-PChien Chih Chen
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
The study examines how a tutoring lesson works for a writer. Specifically, the writer’s writing structure and lexical use via reference tools were looked into to see what changes he has made after the lesson. The participant was a Ph. D. student enrolling in a TESOL theory course. To help him with his writing and carry out data collection, five tutorial lessons were given, followed by a semi-structured interview each time. Five short essays plus a short research paper were built as a writing corpus. The interviews were transcribed and his writings were analyzed. The findings suggest that the learner made progress in terms of his writing structure, though he manifested a progressive and regressive pattern in the process. He was able to use words more appropriately with the ability to use a wider range of reference tools.
10:00 - 10:2525 mins
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10:30 - 10:5525 mins
10:30 - 10:5525 mins
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305-PSian-Hoon Teoh et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Emerging technologies
Universities are urged to transform their education to produce quality education and up-to-date curriculum in line with the demand of with 21st-century skills. Teaching training are preparing preservice teachers for the cultivation of 21st century skills. The system holds prime responsibility to equip themselves with 21st-century skills. Nevertheless, recent research evidence shows the essential of examining factors related to motivation among preservice teachers in adopting 21st century skills in their teaching practice, especially through technology. Hence, this study aims to investigate Malaysian preservice teachers’ motivation in adopting 21st-century skills. Specifically, the results highlight the relationship between the two concepts of research, namely the motivation and the adoption towards 21st century skills. This study employed a sequential exploratory research design to gather data from 150 preservice teachers from two public universities and interviewed 10 participants. The findings revealed a positive relationship between the preservice teachers’ motivation and the adoption of 21st-century skills in teaching. In addition, they expressed the school mentors pitched in for the guidance of adoption of 21st-century skills. The findings imply that the schools learning community can oblige preservice teachers in furnishing 21st-century skills. They can be the catalyst of change for greater promotion of 21st century skills.
10:30 - 10:5525 mins
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306-PVan Thinh Le et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Fostering autonomous learning through technology
Student-content interaction is crucial for the learning process. It is even more important when online teaching is conducted during the pandemic because students are supposed to be more independent and autonomous in online learning. However, few studies have been conducted to examine how students interact with their materials outside the classroom. The current study explored student-materials interactions through a survey at a university in Vietnam. Materials were classified into three different types: compulsory, recommended but not compulsory by teachers, or self-selected materials. Participants were 62 tertiary students who studied English as a major subject at the selected institution in the North of Vietnam in semester 1,2021. The study found that a major of students interacted with compulsory and recommended materials by reading them, doing suggested activities, and discussing with friends. They also reported that they could understand and apply materials to do exercise but not remember the content. Based on the findings, practical implications and suggestions for future research were also provided.
10:30 - 10:5525 mins
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307-PRosalind Ahju
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
Covid-19 pandemic has caused all the Rohingya community preschool’s volunteer teachers to return to their respective country and shifted the preschool curriculum running its lessons online. Many Rohingya parents believed that their children would not learn from a classroom without the physical presence of a teacher and redrawn their children from attending preschool. This study aims to investigate the challenges faced by online preservice teachers. The knowledge gained in planning and implementation the online lessons will improve the quality of online learning. Seven diploma preservice teachers from a private university whose community project is teaching the Rohingya preschoolers online have undertaken this study. Data over a ten-week community service of 22 hours derived from video recordings, weekly discussions, and post-project reports. Findings showed that this project provided the preservice teachers with pedagogy and methodology knowledge of online teaching. The study has identified the problems related to internet connectivity issues, language barriers, and conflict between the preservice teachers and onsite facilitators.
10:30 - 10:5525 mins
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11: 00 - 11: 5555 mins
11: 00 - 11: 5555 mins
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308-KPramela Krish
Keynote speechKeynote (55 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
While research in communication patterns, collaboration, and discussion in the digital platform is ongoing, there are new trends in linguistic research is to understand and study the e-discourse and the digital lingo. Such research has open new pathways for educators and linguistic researchers globally. With more people today actively engaging, communicating and reflecting on all aspects of life via Social Networking Sites (SNSs), this has surely open avenues for accessibility to a wealth of naturally occurring data for researchers to tap and to understand the broader areas of linguistic research. There are opportunities to study new words as well as the early phase of the establishment of the words, via the popular social media platforms such as Twitter, WhatsApp, Telegram and Facebook. I will share some insights in the current areas of research in applied linguistics in the digital era with focus on studies done in the Malaysian context. The challenges that come along with this innovation in research interest and the need to understand the digital lingo will be discussed. The presentation will end with some ethical challenges as each social media research context is unique.
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12:00 - 12:2525 mins
12:00 - 12:2525 mins
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309-PLe Nghi Tran Tran et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Fostering autonomous learning through technology
While countries across the world grapple with continuous lockdowns due to COVID-19 outbreaks, the education sector has adapted and moved on, with technology-enhanced learning becoming the norm in the new normalities. The pandemic has pushed parents to the front line of the learning-at-home battlefield, where the spotlight was traditionally focussed on teachers and students. The current study aimed to further understanding on the role and involvement of parents in their children’s learning at home, an important but under-researched area of the literature on teaching and learning. Mixed methods were adopted as the research design to collect quantitative and qualitative data from 183 parents of school-aged children in Vietnam in 2020. Results revealed that many parents become tutors who spent time: 1/ setting goals,2/ supervising their children’s learning,3/ assisting them with using technologies and solving problems, and 4/ making learning more engaging for their children. The study also identified advantages and challenges for parents while they involved in their children’s learning. The results indicates that only under 15% of the participants found remote learning ineffective or highly ineffective. The study offers practical implications for parents, students, teachers, and schools on how to navigate through remote learning during the pandemic.
12:00 - 12:2525 mins
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310-PHoo Keat Wong et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Sharing picture storybooks with young children is one of the useful sources of developing literacy skills. Due to the cross-channel connections between auditory representations and pictorial representations, it is generally belief that the presentation of narration that is coherent with the picture and text content may add to children’s story comprehension. In this presentation we will present an eye tracking study conducted on 22 four–five-year-old Malaysian prereaders. They were tested for story comprehension ability while their eye movements were being recorded to find out to what extent the inclusion of pictures facilitates understanding of the narration and influence looking pattern. Each of the children listened to brief stories in four conditions: (a) only static text with narration, (b) oral narration and a picture that was congruent with the narration, (c) oral narration and an incongruent picture, and (d) only picture with text but no oral narration. To test if children make an association between narration and visual images during storybook reading, their recorded eye movements, which could reflect processing of relevant/irrelevant visual depictions, were statistically analysed. Based on the associations between looking strategies, story comprehension scores, and vocabulary skills, in this paper presentation, we will discuss the implications for creating digital picture storybooks (e. g. , implementing additional stimulus manipulations to promote the integration of the narrative and nonverbal information when listening to storybooks).
12:00 - 12:2525 mins
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311-PDao Nguyen Anh Duc
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
The coronavirus pandemic has caused schools to shut down and emergency remote teaching (ERT) and learning has become a typical situation that language teachers and learners around the world have found themselves dealing with. The shift from the traditional classroom to a digital educational setting in response to the crisis is never an easy and smooth procedure due to the lack of resources and facilities, inadequate planning, and ineffective pedagogical approaches. Besides, teaching writing skills requires sufficient amounts of learner engagement and interaction for expected outcomes to be achieved, which may expose the L2 teacher to even greater challenges in the virtual environment. This reflective paper aims to provide a template for integrating educational technology into teaching academic writing as a process in the current emergency context. It first identifies the challenges that might occur in each stage of the writing process in this novel context as well as reviews technologies available to the L2 writing teacher. Then, in the reflection section, the author discusses her application of various technological tools in her research paper writing classes. Implications for more effective use of the tools in the future are provided toward the end of the paper.
12:00 - 12:2525 mins
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312-PVan Le
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Foreign language enjoyment (FLE) has brought a lot of benefits to foreign language (FL) learners in their FL acquisition process. During this Coved-19 pandemic, it is really challenging to maintain the FLE in a virtual class. This research aims to investigate whether the Liveworksheet website brings about junior’s enjoyment in English speaking. Eighty juniors at Van Lang University (VLU), Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam participated in this project for twelve weeks. A mixed method was used in combination with three data collection instruments: The Foreign Language Enjoyment Scale (FLES) and a semi-structured interview. The results indicate that Liveworksheet results in FLE. The findings contribute to research on FLE in practice and on CALL by demonstrating how to generate freshmen’s FLE in integrated skill online English classrooms in Vietnam context and offering strategies for learners to reach FLE with Liveworksheet.
12:00 - 12:2525 mins
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12:30 - 12:5525 mins
12:30 - 12:5525 mins
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12:30 - 12:5525 mins
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313-PMy Truong, Ha Dinh
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Kahoot! , a game-based student response system (GSRS), has recently emerged as one popular teaching tool with the participation of seven million teachers worldwide to date (Kahoot! ,2021). In the field of English language teaching, Kahoot! is commonly used in vocabulary lessons because of its user-friendliness, and its potentials in boosting students’ motivation, engagement, and learning outcome (Wang,2015). While the actual effectiveness of a teaching approach depends to a large extent on students’ perceptions, such conclusions on the benefits of Kahoot! , however, have been mostly generated from experts’ and teachers’ voices. This mixed-methods study, therefore, aims to explore (i) what students generally think about, (ii) what they perceive as the actual impacts, and (iii) what they believe as the factors affecting teacher’ use of Kahoot! in English vocabulary teaching. Based on data from 49 university students, collected via questionnaires and follow-up interviews, the findings revealed some interesting discrepancies between participating students’ perceptions and the common beliefs of experts and teachers in the literature about the benefits of Kahoot! and the factors influencing teachers’ use of this game. Such mismatch guarantees useful implications for educators who plan to use Kahoot! in English vocabulary lessons, and gamification approach in teaching more broadly.
12:30 - 12:5525 mins
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314-PNhat Quang Nguyen et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
Since 2020, many EFL emergency classes have been set up globally due to the outbreak of COVID-19. However, online education, especially emergency remote teaching or online emergency learning, is still in its infancy in Vietnam, with only limited studies on learner psychology. This research examined the effects of task-based language teaching and task-assisted language teaching, on EFL learners' L2 motivating self-system and speaking self-efficacy in online emergency classrooms. The researchers recruited two intermediate EFL non-English-majored first-year university student groups (n1=n2=30) at HQT Education, Hochiminh City. The participants alternatingly joined three TBLT and TSLT counterbalanced treatments about three different topics via ZOOM, a synchronous online meeting platform, in two months. After each lesson, an immediate test was conducted to investigate the students' perceived self-efficacy and L2 motivational self-system. Then, there was a two-week washout period to avoid sequencing interferences. Results of the between-groups and in-group t-tests and ANOVA tests with SPSS 20 suggested that the TBLT approach is more effective in motivating students' L2 motivational self system and their speaking efficacy in all alternating online emergency speaking lessons. This study is intended to aid teachers, policymakers, and educational researchers in developing future emergency teaching curricula with justifiable teaching methods.
12:30 - 12:5525 mins
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315-PAlvin, Min Han Auh
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
This is a case study conducted at a teacher training institution in Sabah, Malaysia. The study aims to investigate the issues and different methods used by the teacher trainees to meaningfully integrate technology in an online learning setting to increase engagement and improve the students’ learning experience. This study was conducted because the teacher trainees had to adapt very quickly to the transition from teaching in a physical class to teaching online as a result of the Covid-19 lockdown. The study utilized the SAMR model to investigate how the teacher trainees integrated the use of technologies in online learning during the pandemic. The study investigated three of the teacher trainees for 6 months. This duration is the full duration of their practicum program. Data was collected via interviews and the teacher trainees’ reflective journals. The data collected indicated a gap in the teacher trainees’ knowledge. Specifically, the implementation of online tools to encourage engagement among the students. In addition, the results also showed the process and constraints faced by the teacher trainees as they adapted current, readily available applications into their teaching. These applications include enhancing the learning experience on integrating third party applications into Google Meet sessions.
12:30 - 12:5525 mins
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13: 00 - 13: 2525 mins
13: 00 - 13: 2525 mins
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13: 30 - 14: 2555 mins
13: 30 - 14: 2555 mins
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316-KGordon Bateson
Keynote speechKeynote (55 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Whilst there are numerous online tools to test and assess the receptive skills of reading and listening, it is only recently that tools have been developed to assess the production skills of writing and speaking online. Internationally-recognized tests, including TOEFL, TOEIC, IELTS and Eiken, are all available online nowadays and most include speaking and writing sections. However, the use of human assessors means that the fees for taking these tests are high, and furthermore it takes several weeks the obtain results. To overcome these issues, a new open-source test is proposed that is based around the Moodle LMS. The test features several new plugins to automatically grade speaking and writing. The presenter will detail the development of the plugins, reveal the preliminary version of the test, and explain how the reliability of the test is verified by comparing students' scores with human-ratings and widely used tests.
14:30 - 14:5525 mins
14:30 - 14:5525 mins
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317-PTrang Vo, Long Nguyen, Hang Nguyen
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
It is undeniable that numerous collaborative web tools have been widely applied in English writing teaching. Of all these tools, “Writer”, an application under Zoho platform, is designed to be highly interactive and collaborative thanks to the presence of a virtual space that facilitates online editing with enhanced collaboration. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of “Writer” on enhancing peer editing among non-English major students. The study uses both qualitative and quantitative research method employing quasi-experimental design. Participants of the study were 120 non-English major students (of the University of Da Nang, Vietnam) who participated in a 15-week English course. They were required to complete writing assignments before paper-based peer editing in pairs. In the subsequent stage, during the intervention, participants engaged in technology-assisted peer editing with the aid of “Writer”. Notes from paper-based and technology-assisted conditions were analyzed and questionnaires were then carried out with an aim of discovering students’ perspective on the impacts of “Writer” on their peer editing. The findings reveal a significant enhancement in peer editing in the case of technology-assisted condition. In addition, under students’ perspective, Writer is a beneficial tool for highly effective peer editing among non-English major students.
14:30 - 14:5525 mins
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318-PAmjaad Alwadei
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Visual materials have been examined in L2 literature to see their affordances to aid second language vocabulary acquisition. However, little is known about the impact of infographics on vocabulary learning. The current study was designed to explore the impact of infographics on vocabulary learning and retention among EFL learners. The study adopts a quasi-experimental two-group pretest-posttest design. To this end, Saudi female college students took part in this study, in which the experimental group was taught vocabulary using infographics while the control group was taught using the traditional way of instruction. Inforgraphic materials were designed to teach the students' course. Recognition knowledge of vocabulary was assessed using two tests: word definition and word grammatical measures which were administered before intervention, immediately after the learning sessions completion, and at a delayed time. A n oral interview was used to gauge the learners’ production knowledge. Moreover, questionnaire was utilized to explore the learners’ perceptions toward using infographics for learning vocabulary. The findings of study showed that the treatment group significantly outscored the control group in vocabulary recognition knowledge and the vocabulary production knowledge over the immediate and long run. Further, participants in the experimental group showed high perceived usefulness of learning with infographics.
14:30 - 14:5525 mins
Stream 3
319-PDeliang Man et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Training language teachers in e-learning environments
Informed teaching consists of a coherent set of teacher beliefs and practices. However, it is not always an easy task to put into practice one’s beliefs for reasons of real-life constraints and challenges in one’s teaching context. This is particularly true when teachers have to adopt a completely unfamiliar way of teaching in their transition from the traditional face-to-face mode to an abrupt remote teaching mode. This paper reports on a study which aimed to explore teacher beliefs and practices regarding assessment feedback in remote teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on interviews and feedback comments of a university lecturer as a case study, the study showed how the lecturer prioritized the motivational role of feedback in her teaching to provide the necessary emotional support for her students. It was also found that while she had a strong belief in the value of different sources of feedback including peer feedback, she did not implement peer feedback for practical reasons. The findings of the study suggest how teacher beliefs might not always translate into practice and indicate factors that contributed to that. Implications for feedback practices are considered.
14:30 - 14:5525 mins
Stream 4
320-PSuzan Stamper
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
After more than a year of experimenting with new tools in online lessons, educators should reflect on what tools can be used to reimagine post-COVID classes. In this session, the presenter will introduce one new tool - a free collaborative web-based whiteboard tool called Miro that can be used synchronously or asynchronously. Similar to the graphic tools found in other whiteboards and presentation features found in Prezi, Miro's tools can add text, shapes, sticky notes, documents, images, pdfs, videos, and URLs. However, Miro also offers several unique features that are especially useful for language learners such as templates for mind mapping, brainstorming, dot voting, Kanban workflows, Likert scales, ice breakers, and reflections. Teachers can make use of a timer, voting, presentation mode, real-time video chat, comments, board annotations, and reactions (similar to Zoom’s emoticons for raising hands, thumbs up, applause). Everyone can see changes on the board in real-time. The possibilities appear to be endless as content expands in the Miro board. This presentation will include a brief introduction to Miro and some language classroom examples promoting collaboration (e. g. , self-introductions, group writing/telling a story, sorting/matching information, documenting a project). The presentation will end with benefits and limitations.
14:30 - 14:5525 mins
Stream 5
15:00 - 15:2525 mins
15:00 - 15:2525 mins
Stream 2
322-PSaleem Mohd Nasim et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
The use of digital technology has become ubiquitous in every walk of our lives. It has impacted upon not only social and technological aspects, but also educational areas, including (English) language teaching. Digital tools, the gift of new technologies, have proved to be an essential component of English Language Teaching (ELT). This study focused on finding out the efficacy of teaching pronunciation via digital tools (CDs, digital books, projectors, smart boards, and synchronous and asynchronous online materials) as opposed to traditional methods (printed material, drilling and imitating the teacher) to Saudi male EFL undergraduates. To investigate the differences, a quasi-experimental, pre-posttests design (between-subjects) was used. The experimental and control groups (n=25 in each group) were tested before and after the treatment on similar intra-sentential pronunciation activities at segmental (minimal pairs, word recognition, and consonant and vowel identification) and supra-segmental (stress patterns) levels. The results revealed that the participants in the experimental group learned pronunciation significantly better than the participants in the control group. This means that if students are exposed to digital technology tools, they will learn pronunciation better in comparison to the conventional method of teaching. The study was significant for both teachers and learners as it may help them to make use of digital technology tools to improve students’ pronunciation as well as improve their speaking skills.
15:00 - 15:2525 mins
Stream 3
323-PChee Hao Sue et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Emerging technologies
There is a dearth of studies investigating the cognitive process behind the development of literacy skills among young children. This research attempts to address this in a Malaysian context using an experimental procedure created with eye-tracking technology. The children were exposed to four conditions: (a) listening to a narration and viewing a congruent picture with text, (b) listening to a narration and viewing a incongruent picture with text, (c) viewing a picture with text without narration and (d) listening to a narration and viewing a text. The main objectives of this project are to test which content of pictures helps the students understand the narration and the text, and also to test whether children try to create a coherent mental representation from the oral narration and the pictures. The 22 children (age 5 to 6) for this study came from a kindergarten in Kuala Lumpur. An eye tracker was used to identify areas of interest of each picture and calculate number of fixations and total time spent on the pictures and written texts. The findings revealed that children strongly preferred pictures to texts but when narration was not present, they spent more time looking at the text, reflecting a greater amount of mental effort in processing words when the verbal information was unavailable.
15:00 - 15:2525 mins
Stream 4
15:00 - 15:2525 mins
Stream 5
15:30 - 15:5525 mins
15:30 - 15:5525 mins
Stream 1
324-PTakanori Omura
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Fostering autonomous learning through technology
The research that successful learning can be achieved by self-management skills or high learner autonomy has drawn the attention of many researchers. Due to the development of technology in recent years, the effect of an electronic form of portfolio called e-portfolio towards language learning has been further expected. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how the implementation of e-portfolio can improve the students’ learner autonomy and how the students’ perception on e-portfolio can change over the academic year. The study participants were 37 first-year university students who took a general English course at a private university in Tokyo. The online surveys were administered at the start and end of one academic semester in order to compare the score in their learner autonomy and inspect their perception on e-portfolio. The results showed that the students’ learner autonomy slightly increased while the perception on e-portfolio was overall positive. By being able to manage their own learning, the present study revealed that the use of e-portfolio was substantially helpful for students to become more autonomous in language learning. The findings of the present study could also be applicable to a variety of instructional settings.
15:30 - 15:5525 mins
Stream 2
325-PTri Minh Nguyen et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
The spread of Covid 19 pandemic has shifted the physical classroom into the online learning to maintain the continuous acquisition among learners, especially in writing class. In the context of Vietnam, the use of peer assessment has been applied to to foster the learners’ reflection and autonomy as an alternative forms of formative assessment; however, the success of this method is not ensured in certain pedagogical contexts. This paper aims to explore teachers’ perceptions towards the importance and practicality of asynchronous peer assessment in online writing classes in the pandemic and investigate how teachers apply asynchronous peer assessment in their classroom practice. The data in this mixed method design were collected via a questionnaire and in-depth interview with 15 university lecturers. The findings reveal the misalignment in the belief and practice of these participants. Although they acknowledge the benefits of asynchronous peer assessment in online writing class for self-reflection, autonomy enhancement, and improvement of overall performance, just roughly over a half apply this method because of the challenges in terms of learners’ proficiency, profound assessment training, and time constraint for personalised revision.
15:30 - 15:5525 mins
Stream 3
326-PRino Shafierul Azizie Shahrir Raghbir et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
The study explores the compatibility of existing theoretical models related to the implementation of online games in language learning. The paper attempts to systematically review past studies in terms of theories, conceptual frameworks, and models that measure and analyse the effectiveness of online games as means of language learning. Specifically, the paper looks into selected latest studies that focus on investigating the use of online gaming and language learning in terms of variables/factors, methodologies, and results/findings. The primary search is conducted using the following databases: Web of Science (WoS), ScienceDirect, IEEE Xplore, JSTOR Archive, Scopus, and SAGE Journals. The inclusion criteria consist of research articles published between January 2015 to June 2021, full text must be available, research articles are to be written in English language, and conference abstract papers are excluded. In order to project a systematic account reflecting the progression of online gaming and language learning related studies, the implications and recommendations by past studies will also be delineated.
15:30 - 15:5525 mins
Stream 4
15:30 - 15:5525 mins
Stream 5
16: 00 - 16: 2525 mins
16: 00 - 16: 2525 mins
Stream 1
Day 3: Closing ceremony
327-E
Ceremonial event
Some final words of appreciation and a look ahead to the future.
Virtual Presentations
Virtual Presentation
Virtual Presentation
Virtual Presentation
Virtual Presentation

The virtual presentations at GLoCALL 2019 are viewable
from the main webpage for this conference:
https://glocall.org/course/view.php?id=32

Virtual Presentation
401-VMohsen Shirazizadeh
Individual sessionVirtual presentationApplication of technology to the language classroom
Academic writing has long been a challenge for non-native students. It is well established that knowledge of academic words is a pre-requisite for writing appropriate academic texts. While words are key to success in academic writing, the most effective method for their instruction is underexplored. To fill this gap, this study compared the effect of teaching academic words, with and without their collocates, on the academic writing competence of Iranian medical students. To this aim,32 Iranian students were divided into two groups. For both the pretest and post-test, students were required to write on an academic writing topic within the area of medicine. As for the treatment, learners in one group were presented to a sample of academic words from the Academic Vocabulary List (AVL) and asked to explore their use by checking concordance lines in the academic section of COCA. The other group was however asked to explore the same set of words by searching for their collocates and then exploring the concordance lines where the words have appeared with their collocates. While both groups improved in the post-tests, no significant difference was found between them. Implications of these findings for CALL and EAP are discussed.
Virtual Presentation
402-VSharon Vijaya Balakrishnan
Individual sessionVirtual presentationApplication of technology to the language classroom
The Covid-19 pandemic has caused unprecedented changes in the teaching and learning process resulting in the shift from face-to-face to online instructions. The shift to online teaching has raised concerns on the teachers’ digital competency and their challenges in online instructions. The current study explored English language teachers' perceptions and challenges faced during the sudden shift to online teaching mode. The study used exploratory descriptive approach and employed both survey and interview methods to collect data. A sample of 102 primary school English language teachers from government schools in Perak, Malaysia participated in the survey and 10 teachers were interviewed. The results revealed that teachers’ perceived ease of use of online teaching using Google Classroom, WhatsApp, and Telegram Groups in terms of utility and simplicity of the online teaching mode was high. The ease of use of the online tools suggests that teachers perceived the online teaching mode effective. Further, teachers who are not prepared to accommodate the changes, faced challenges in implementing online learning. Aspects such as online teaching strategies, psychological qualities, and technological competence among English language teachers confirmed as influential factors in online teaching practices. The research recommends the need for continuous professional development training programme for in-service teachers to improve their digital competency for effective online teaching experiences.
Virtual Presentation
403-VThuy Ngo
Individual sessionVirtual presentationFostering autonomous learning through technology
During the Covid – 19 epidemic, online courses were utilized at all levels of schooling. Enhancing students' autonomy has also become one of the most pressing concerns in these online courses as there is no direct connection between teachers and students during this period. To tackle with the issue, it is believed that teachers should use effective online learning tools to engage students and foster their self-study process. However, there may be a fact that no matter how many tools have been used, their effectiveness may not be examined thoroughly. As a result, the research was done in an online Writing class to model how one teacher used online learning media in her classroom and assess how effective online learning media were through both quantitative and qualitative methods with academic results (pretest, post-test), questionnaires, interviews, and observation. One hundred and thirty-four 2nd year EFL students (4 classes) of Van Lang University participated in the study. The findings revealed that some used strategies were quite beneficial in enhancing student autonomy, while others were severely constrained. Moreover, the study results are simultaneously beneficial to reading, speaking, and listening skills to keep the students on track of self-improvement and well-prepared for a career after graduation.
Virtual Presentation
404-VYanqiu Chen, Shin Yi Chew
Individual sessionVirtual presentationApplication of technology to the language classroom
With the advanced development in mobile technology, there is a need to explore the potential of synchronous voice chats (SVC) operated within a mobile-assisted environment using mobile instant messaging apps. This study aimed to compare the speaking performance of Chinese EFL learners in both synchronous voice-based chat and face-to-face chat modes and explore the relationship between learners’ speaking performance and anxiety levels in these two chat modes which allow real-time communication. In this mixed methods study, WeChat instant messaging was used as the platform for synchronous voice-based chat (SVC). Forty students from a public university in China participated in 4 chat sessions in SVC and F2F chat modes over 4 weeks. Quantitative data were collected through the oral scores of the participants’ performance in the chat sessions and anxiety questionnaires. Then, qualitative data were obtained from a focus group interview. The findings revealed a significant difference in learners’ speaking performance in SVC and F2F chat. Students’ speaking performance outperformed in SVC chat compared to F2F chat. This could be linked to students’ anxiety levels which were slightly higher in F2F chat. Despite that, most of the students preferred F2F chat to SVC chat due to the practicality of F2F chat.
Virtual Presentation
405-VAzran Azmee Kafia
Individual sessionVirtual presentationApplication of technology to the language classroom
Drawing on Vandergrift’s (2006) metacognitive awareness raising listening questionnaire and using podcast technology to expedite undergraduate L2 listening comprehension this study was to explore if podcast helped learners develop listening comprehension and metacognitive awareness. The purpose of this study examined i) does a podcast, BBC sounds, play role in improving learners’ listening comprehension, ii) to what extent does the relationship between listening comprehension and metacognitive awareness help learners improve learning? To apprehend the research objectives, twenty Bangladeshi undergraduate EFL learners in the experimental group (n = 10) and the control group (n = 10) attended the intervention for five weeks during the pandemic. Participants of the experimental group received metacognitive instruction attending five transactional listening texts from the podcast, BBC Sounds, and performed on the worksheets designed on the pedagogical sequence (Vandergrift and Goh,2012). Simultaneously, participants of the control group attended the same podcasts texts but the traditional product-based approach and performed the worksheets with comprehension questions. Both groups attended pre-test, post-test and two metacognitive awareness listening questionnaires (MALQ) before and after the intervention. The quantitative method research embodied the notion of triangulation for this study. Using one-way within-subjects ANOVA, the result revealed that there was a positive correlation (r= 0.63) between metacognitive awareness and L2 listening comprehension accounted for the total variance in the data. This study implied that podcasts could help learners to develop and be used by teachers to guide them systematically.
Virtual Presentation
406-VDuy Linh Nguyen, Vu Long Nguyen
Individual sessionVirtual presentationFostering autonomous learning through technology
Social networking media have become an indispensable part of language education that educators can apply in their teaching to effectively improve their student’s language ability. Among them, Schoology offers a social networking environment providing effective tools in promoting learners’ self-regulated learning (SRL). In this study, Schoology was applied as a learning channel for learners to work together with their teachers and their peers. Schoology – based self-regulated learning on non – English major undergraduates to enhance their English abilities was examined via pre-test and post-test, and their attitudes toward Schoology – based self-regulated learning (SBRL) were investigated through the questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. This mixed-method study was conducted during 8 weeks with 60 non-English majors including 30 students in an experimental group and 30 students in a controlled group. The results from the pretest and posttest showed that SBRL increased participants’ English abilities significantly. The data from the questionnaire and interviews indicated that students had positive attitudes toward SBRL. The findings of this study have confirmed that Schoology could possibly become an alternative online learning platform to support students’ learning process.
Virtual Presentation
407-VAndrea Rakushin Lee
Individual sessionVirtual presentationE-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, many educators had to transition from face-to-face to online classes. Zoom has become a popular platform for live, online classes in different educational contexts including English language learning. This phenomenological study sought to gain insight into South Korean students’ satisfaction with Zoom breakout rooms in English communication classes. Participants included 25 undergraduate students attending English communication classes at a university in central South Korea. Data collection comprised an open-ended survey, a focus group, and individual interviews. Data analysis centered on examining significant statements and developing themes. The results of this study indicate that most students were satisfied with using Zoom breakout rooms for EFL classes. Furthermore, students expanded on various benefits of using Zoom breakout rooms and provided recommendations for improvement. This paper concludes with practical implications and suggestions for future research pertaining to the use of Zoom breakout rooms in EFL classes. There were different activities carried out in the breakout rooms. Some examples of these will also be discussed.
408-PNguyen Hong Nhung
Individual sessionPoster (60 mins)Fostering autonomous learning through technology
It is an indisputable fact that conducting scientific research requires a great deal of effort. Besides, research writing skills are compulsory for undergraduate students to master so that they are competitive in labor market. Recently, due to social distancing, which learners have been exposed to distance learning in hundreds of countries, the undergraduates have found acquiring in-depth knowledge of how to undertake scientific papers in online classes more challenging than in traditional ones. This study aims to determine how juniors’ and seniors’ motivation were affected when they anticipated virtual courses of research writing in a foreign languages department at a university. The study commenced when the impacts of distance learning on students’ impetus were theoretically classified into two groups, external group and the internal. Six factors including assessment practices, social influences, instructional materials, anxiety, goal orientation, and attitudes towards such a learning approach were taken into our considerations. Then, a survey was conducted with the participation of approximately 100 English-majored students. According to the findings, assessment practices and instructional materials gained no influences upon the students’ motivation because they remained unchanged regardless of which kind of learning approaches. The undergraduates’ inclination was externally affected by social factors such as former students’ beliefs, peer influences, and home supports. Regarding internal factors, goal orientation had a profound impact on students’ impetus.
Last modified: Monday, 6 December 2021, 4:10 PM [JST]