GLoCALL 2019
Aug 8th
(Thu)
Aug 9th
(Fri)
Aug 10th
(Sat)
Virtual
Presentations
Aug 8th (Thu)
08: 00 - 09: 0060 mins
08: 00 - 09: 0060 mins
HC303 100 seats
Day 1: Registration
Registration
Collect your badge and other conference documents in the registration area, and meet other delegates in the coffee area.
HC303 100 seats
HC303 100 seats
HC303 100 seats
HC303 100 seats
09: 00 - 10: 0060 mins
09: 00 - 10: 0060 mins
HC303 100 seats
102-WCynthia White
Keynote speechWorkshop (60 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
My work with language teachers shows that guidelines can be a useful tool to learn more about CALL – and that the knowledge gained can enhance teacher research and practice. A key factor in using guidelines is adopting a deep and critical approach while also drawing on teachers’ experiences, current concerns and the particular features of their current contexts. This workshop uses practical activities for language teachers, researchers and professionals to answer the following questions: What are some current guidelines for teaching reflectively with technology? How can I use them to improve my practice? What are current guidelines for best practice in CALL research? How can I use them to improve my research skills? How can I use them to improve my understanding of CALL research?
10: 00 - 10: 3030 mins
10: 00 - 10: 3030 mins
HC303 100 seats
Day 1: Morning refreshment break
Refreshment
Enjoy a break in the refreshment area.
10: 30 - 11: 3060 mins
10: 30 - 11: 3060 mins
HC303 100 seats
104-WKaren Price
Keynote speechWorkshop (60 minutes)Emerging technologies
Augmented Reality (AR) apps add content to what someone actually sees in the real world. Pointing a smartphone or iPad at an everyday object might bring up the printed word for that object on the screen at the same time the user continues to see the actual object. Or, users might hear the pronunciation of the word for the object, see a video related to that object, or have a Google doc appear. Many AR apps also incorporate GPS (Global Positioning System) to bring up information that will appear only when a user is in a specific location. Such capabilities are used by tour companies to guide visitors in the physical world and by gamers and educators to create scavenger hunts for students. AR is not just for the technology giants. Anyone can develop AR apps with free software. Bring your smartphones and iPads to learn how you might consider creating lessons for your students.
11: 30 - 12: 3060 mins
11: 30 - 12: 3060 mins
HC303 100 seats
105-WEric Hagley
Keynote speechWorkshop (60 minutes)Using the Internet for cultural exchange
Do you want your students to interact with students from other countries but don't know how to organize that? Do you want your students to not only use English as an "academic" language but to use it in real-world communication? If the answer to these questions is "yes" then join this workshop to find out how your students can become part of one of the biggest language and culture learning groups in the world. The IVEProject is sponsored by the Japanese government and Muroran Institute of Technology and is free-of-charge for teachers to access with their students. Once they do, students can interact with students from other countries and use the language they are studying in class to communicate with real people in other countries in a safe environment. This workshop introduces the IVEProject which has had over 15,000 students and 200 teachers from 14 countries and 50 institutions in South America, Asia, the Middle East and Europe participating in exchanges over the last 3 years. Students interact online in English-as-a-lingua-franca using Moodle. Each exchange is 8-weeks long employing various tasks to encourage student interaction in addition to language and cultural development. You will learn how you and your students can participate in this workshop.
Aug 9th (Fri)
08: 00 - 08: 3030 mins
08: 00 - 08: 3030 mins
A10140 seats
Day 2: Registration
Registration
Conference presentations start today, so please come early to meet your fellow conference-goers and make the most of the exciting schedule.
08: 30 - 08: 5020 mins
08: 30 - 08: 5020 mins
A10140 seats
Day 2: Opening ceremony
Ceremonial event
The conference will be officially declared open by local dignitaries and distinguished guests.
08: 50 - 09: 1020 mins
08: 50 - 09: 1020 mins
A10140 seats
Day 2: Photo session
Ceremonial event
Please congregate in the main hall for the official conference photograph.
09: 10 - 10: 0050 mins
09: 10 - 10: 0050 mins
Hall A300 seats
204-KBao Kham
Keynote speechKeynote (50 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
This paper aims at deconstructing the newly discovered concept of communicative repertoire and explores the role of technology in the development of the repertoire. Proposed by Nicholas and Starks (2014), the communicative repertoire, part of the communicative competence, is where features of all available resources have been noticed and stored by individuals who will select, combine, and deploy them appropriately for the purpose of communication. The repertoire is composed of the two categories of dimensions, physical/technological and social. The physical/technological categories contain two different dimensions, modes including elements such as sound, movement, image and spatial orientation and mediations including elements like human body, analogue, digital and digital control. The social categories consist of two other dimensions, varieties with such elements as spatial (macro- and micro-geopolitical), personal (physical and experiential), and temporal, and purposes containing elements like macro-text, micro-text, key, and otherness. The communicative repertoire contains in itself various elements where technology can act upon available communicative resources. This paper identifies and suggests all the possible ways individual learners can employ technology to develop and deploy their communicative repertoire.
10: 00 - 10: 2020 mins
10: 00 - 10: 2020 mins
A10140 seats
Day 2: Morning refreshment break
Refreshment
Enjoy a break in the refreshment area.
A10140 seats
A10240 seats
A10330 seats
B10140 seats
B10240 seats
B10330 seats
C30180 seats
C303100 seats
10: 20 - 10: 4525 mins
10: 20 - 10: 4525 mins
A10140 seats
206-WVance Stevens
Individual sessionWorkshop (60 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
The presenter demonstrates techniques that streamline correction and feedback on student writing utilizing Google Docs and voice input features native to tablet and mobile devices. The workshop is in three parts. The first part demonstrates giving feedback using Google Docs and shows video evidence of its effectiveness. The second part shows how the same feedback can be given using voice tools, freeing the teacher to move among the students, speak into a handheld device, and have the spoken feedback appear as comments in the student's Google Doc. The third part shows how teachers can encourage writing fluency by speaking what students write on paper into Google Docs. The teacher returns the original paper with printouts of what the students wrote expressed in correct language. On the printouts are written suggestions for development of their ideas. The students revise in Google Docs from these suggestions. Subsequent revision cycles address both accuracy and fluency, but starting with a version of the student's work which is not bogged down in errors from the outset. Evidence of success with improving writing fluency will be presented and participants will come away from the workshop able to apply the technique in their own writing classes.
10: 20 - 10: 4525 mins
A10240 seats
207-WJonny Western
Individual sessionWorkshop (60 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
In RMIT’s English for Teens program, there are elements of Project Based Learning specifically giving students voice and choice. Projects in the textbook (Impact) have been adapted and scaffolded to meet the needs of Vietnamese teenagers. Learner motivation and active engagement are promoted by integrating the use of technology. Students are supported in making their own decisions about which software and apps to use for creating and sharing their project outputs, whether this is through videos, podcasts, presentations, posters, etc. This workshop will share how the projects were developed to build on the motivational aspects of project-based learning through the use of technology to support and sustain cognitive focus. The participants will reflect on how the purposeful and scaffolded integration of technology can help to develop critical thinking, problem-solving, creativity and innovation, communication, and collaboration as well as global awareness. We will then illustrate some examples that participants can adapt for their own contexts, such as Pre-Intermediate level examples where teen learners complete three projects - designing a digital poster, building a simple website and developing a presentation - all involving the use of technology to collaborate, research and create. Participants will then discuss, in groups, how they could adapt a given textbook prompt into a project to meet the needs of their learners. Finally, we will share some feedback from our teachers and the teen students themselves about their thoughts on the projects they have undertaken.
10: 20 - 10: 4525 mins
A10330 seats
208-PWarid Mihat et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Each reader has specific characteristics but the study that focuses on average readers’ oculomotor behaviours is still scarcely done. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the patterns of average readers by comparing participants’ oculomotor rates recorded using an eye-tracking apparatus with their comprehension score and gaze plot observation. This pilot study involved 20 participants aged 12 who were identified as average readers using Cambridge Assessment KET Reading and Writing test at A2 level. Identified participants are then divided into expeditious and careful reading groups. These two groups were required to read narrative, expository and info-graphic texts during the eye tracking observation. In this Explanatory Sequential Mixed Method (QUAN-qual) design, Eye-Tracking Tobi Pro 2 Glasses 50Hz was employed to collect participants’ oculomotor rates. The saccadic rates were analysed using SPSS and triangulated with data from exit interviews and gaze plot observations. The preliminary findings indicated that: (1) participants did not perform second reading to reaffirm their understanding; (2) participants skipped unknown words but continued reading the whole text; (3) saccadic rates in expository text were slightly lower than the narrative text, and (4) participants’ eyes did not re-focus to the last word (area of interest) after leaving the reading parameter.
10: 20 - 10: 4525 mins
B10240 seats
211-PChau Meng Huat
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
With the advent of technology, computer analysis of large data has become possible. One of the applications in this area has been in the study of language acquisition/development through large collections of data now widely known as learner corpora (Barlow,2005; Chau,2012; Granger,1998; Granger et al. ,2015). This paper reports on a longitudinal corpus study of 496 essays written by 124 secondary school students at four different points in time over a 24-month period. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part reviews research relevant to the present study on the use of the small word ‘of’ in the longitudinal corpus, and presents an analysis based on a total of 1,034 concordance lines containing all the instances of use of the word in the entire corpus. Here, three major categories of patterns of use of this word in the longitudinal data are discussed. The second part of the paper considers what the findings reveal about the process of language development. Four key developmental patterns are identified and the nature of language development examined. The paper closes with implications for the language classroom.
10: 20 - 10: 4525 mins
B10330 seats
212-PLee Kok Yueh, Hassell David
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
This paper presents preliminary findings on the application of GoogleDocs as an online discussion platform for Bruneian students undertaking a research report writing assignment. The study comprised thirty-four first year undergraduates on Professional Communication module, who were put into eight groups of four to five and tasked with developing a research report. Four groups adopted GoogleDocs to discuss and develop the assignment whilst the other four groups adopted a more traditional face-to-face approach. Two sets of questionnaires, pre and post to the report assignment, were distributed to investigate students’ attitude and preference towards both approaches. Evaluation using statistical tools indicated students shared mixed feelings towards its use where students without prior experience of GoogleDocs found it a positive experience and useful for their learning. Students preferred the real-time accessibility, and time-saving features of the platform as compared to face-to-face discussion where some students experienced difficulties due to conflicting availability. Results recognise the merits of GoogleDocs but also indicate that some students still prefer face-to-face discussion. These preliminary findings highlight the increasing ways in which technology can augment and benefit educational practices in specific cultures/circumstances, whilst indicating the requirement for a wider investigation into the use of this technology.
10: 20 - 10: 4525 mins
C30180 seats
213-PTran Le Nghi Tran
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Fostering autonomous learning through technology
When it comes to professional development, two of the major obstacles facing busy teachers are heavy workloads and the costs of travelling and training. Mobile technologies can help teachers fit learning into their tight schedules as it enables bite-sized learning anywhere, anytime at low cost. However, teachers have various attitudes towards learning with technologies and therefore tend to engage in different ways with mobile learning. This presentation reports parts of the findings from a design-based research project on the use of mobile learning for professional development provision in the context of Vietnam. The project involved 51 EFL teachers from universities based in 24 cities and provinces across the country. Data were collected over a two-year period using semi-structured interviews, surveys as well as pre and post tests, weekly learning reports and learning analytics submitted in form of screenshots by the participants. The presentation focuses on Vietnamese EFL teachers’ attitudes and engagement patterns as well as proposed strategies to better facilitate their learning with mobile technologies. The findings suggest practical implications for teachers of English, teacher trainers and training providers in terms of learning design and implementation with a focus on online and self-directed learning with mobile technologies.
10: 20 - 10: 4525 mins
C303100 seats
214-PHarwati Hashim et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Emerging technologies
English language learning has undergone tremendous change over the years due to the remarkable entry of technology. The most recent technology that is making its way in education is Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology. AI has already been applied to education primarily in some tools that help to develop certain skills. As AI educational solutions continue to mature, the hope is that AI can help fill needs gaps in learning and teaching of English as a Second Language (ESL). The aim of this paper is to review studies on the integration of AI in language learning to look for the promising outcomes of the integration of AI specifically audible devices as virtual learning assistants. The findings from the review predict the potential usage of audible devices as virtual learning assistants for ESL learning in the future. The capability of the virtual learning assistant in interpreting human speech and respond via synthesized voices is hoped to provide a platform for learning ESL. This paper imposes some recommendations in leveraging the best attributes of the audible devices as virtual learning assistants for the best outcome for ESL learning, especially among the less successful learners.
10: 55 - 11: 2025 mins
10: 55 - 11: 2025 mins
A10330 seats
215-PPham Hong-Anh
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
While teaching methods have been a sustained focus of research into application of new online technology to the English language classroom, the development of multiple roles and identities in a new teaching and learning space has received relatively little attention. Drawing on a case study of three EFL wiki writing classes at Hue University, this paper explores how the introduction of wiki as a new platform for writing induces negotiation and construction of teacher identity when the teacher of the writing classes faces a clash of traditional and new teaching climates. Using qualitative case study methodology, the paper shows how the teacher evidently and continuously constructs multiple roles and identities when in both the traditional class, which operates alongside with other classes at the same level in the institution, and on wiki. Emerging issues relating to reconfiguration of learner identity on wiki and how that relates to the negotiation and construction of teacher identity, are also revealed in the paper. The paper concludes with insights into the potential contribution of wiki writing experiences to classroom roles and identities.
10: 55 - 11: 2025 mins
B10140 seats
270-PKok Yueh Lee et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Evaluation is crucial for successful academic writing (Thompson & Hunston,2000). One of the structures that are widely used to express evaluation is that -complement clauses (Biber, Johansson, Leech, Conrad & Finegan,1999; Hyland & Tse,2005; Charles,2007). Despite its prevalence and importance in academic writing, relatively overlooked is how learners of English would go about using this structure to express evaluation over time. This paper reports on a study which examines the use of evaluative that -clauses in a longitudinal corpus of over 300 argumentative essays produced by a group of undergraduate students at a university in Brunei. The data were collected at four different points in time over a period of one semester. Results based on computer analysis suggest students’ dynamic use of language resources over time, in line with the findings of Man and Chau (2019), who examined the use of evaluative that -clauses by undergraduate students in China. The study, based on an approach to treating learner language in its own right (Selinker,1972; Pallotti,2017), contributes to our understanding of the nature of language development. Implications for language teaching are considered.
10: 55 - 11: 2025 mins
B10240 seats
216-PLê Đỗ Thanh Hiền et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Currently, Vietnamese non-majored students in tertiary education are struggling with English learning and rather confused of searching suitable ways to enhance their language abilities. The growing interest in mobile learning, that is, learning through mobile applications has been noticed in recent years. For the purpose of building a more flexible environment with engaged and enthusiastic students compared to traditional settings, Edmodo – a free and secure educational learning network was integrated into the curriculum as a supplementary tool. Previous studies have shown that Edmodo allows users to interact and share ideas or knowledge freely, which brings them a lot of inspiration in learning. The participants were 100 non-English majored students in two General English classes. The data will be collected through pre and post questionnaires, and semi-structured interviews. The result of the study indicates that the students have considerably positive attitudes towards the use of Edmodo as a useful and beneficial learning tool to supplemen t traditional classroom settings. Furthermore, it is considered as an effective tool to enhance students’ motivation, flexibility and participation in mobile learning. The finding of this study could be used to inspire the teachers to design more mobile learning activities.
10: 55 - 11: 2025 mins
B10330 seats
217-PGordon Bateson
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
This presentation will consider to what extent student written work can be graded automatically online. In extensive writing, students are encouraged to write a lot, so that quantity and fluency are emphasized over accuracy. Activities such as journal writing and timed writing are popular activities that encourage this writing style. However, checking and grading such work has hitherto placed a great burden on the teacher because it has to be checked manually. As use of online learning management systems, such as Moodle, has spread, it has become possible for students to submit written work online, and this opens up the intriguing possibility of grading the written work automatically. The presenter will introduce an Extensive Reading and Writing course in which a recently developed plugin for Moodle was used to award a provisional grade based on the number of words, and the presence of target phrases. Additionally, the tool searches for common errors that have been specified by the teacher and deducts points if any are found.
10: 55 - 11: 2025 mins
C30180 seats
218-PPatricia Angelina
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
Advancement in technology has brought upon innovations in education. This study aims to elaborate the learning activities conducted using a newly emerged teaching approach called flipped learning, a teaching approach that inverts the traditional learning process. Flipped learning omits lectures and provides the materials online for students to learn outside the class so that discussion and group activities can take place inside the class. This study involves 35 students from Language Teaching Media course. They have to access and learn the materials from the videos, PPTs and textbooks provided on the Moodle learning platform on their own before the class begins. In class, the instructor chooses random groups of students to start the discussion on the materials studied and also conducts group project sessions. In addition to exploring the activities conducted using flipped learning approach in the course, this study also mentions some positive effects as well as drawbacks of the flipped learning implementation experienced by the students.
10: 55 - 11: 2025 mins
C303100 seats
219-PEdo Forsythe
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
This session presents the results of a single case study that explored Japanese university students' perceptions of being required to use their own smartphones in English language learning activities. At first, the presenter's experience with Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL) teaching methods and how the presenter incorporated smartphones into English language classrooms will be explained, along with a brief presentation of the details of the research study. Then a discussion of the research findings will be held, focusing on potential implications for teachers who plan to incorporate the use of student smartphones and other mobile technology in their language lessons. Finally, session participants will be given an opportunity to share and discuss how they use mobile technology in their classrooms, as well as ask questions about MALL methodology. Attendees will come away with research data supporting the use of students' mobile devices in English classes, as well as several ideas for effectively and efficiently using MALL techniques in their own classrooms. This session presents updated research which was presented at JALTCALL 2018 in Nagoya, Japan and AsiaCALL 2017 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
11: 30 - 11: 5525 mins
11: 30 - 11: 5525 mins
A10140 seats
220-WJoseph Dias
Individual sessionWorkshop (60 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Studies looking at whether students in the US (Marin and Halpern,2011) benefit from explicit instruction in critical thinking have concluded that they do. However, at the tertiary level it is sometimes optimistically assumed that students have mastered the basics of critical thinking earlier in their education. The speaker will demonstrate tasks designed to help university students consider multiple perspectives in order to avoid the hazards of deceptive, misleading, or biased information. These tasks will include comparisons of the same news story from multiple sources and types of media, the use of specially designed websites meant to challenge students to uncover spurious arguments, and a semester-length project investigating controversial issues by analyzing the good, bad, and ugly of information sources. In the course described, students learn how to access different sorts of electronic sources related to their topic—Websites, online reference works, Internet radio, and broadcast news online—and they are taught critical evaluation issues unique to various sources. They then chronicle, through a blog, the evolution of their thoughts on the issues researched. Ultimately, students use the information they have vetted in order to create an NPO modeled after some of the advocacy sites they have accessed and analyzed.
11: 30 - 11: 5525 mins
A10240 seats
221-PThomas Robb
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
MReader is a free web-based program that allows teachers to track their students' extensive reading through easy 10-item randomized quizzes on over 7000 graded and youth readers. It motivates the students to read by awarding them with the cover of each book on their personal home page, along with a progress bar that shows how many words they have read. After introducing the software, we will see how the program is used in some universities in Vietnam.
11: 30 - 11: 5525 mins
A10330 seats
222-PMarc Siskin
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
An increasing number of language educators would like to conduct CALL research projects, or they may need to collect data from language learners for a variety of other purposes. The presenter will demonstrate several technology applications that are used to collect data from learners in foreign language courses at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). Examples of the collected data will be shown. The applications were developed by the faculty and graduate students at CMU. Linguistic output in the form of text, audio, and video files can be saved, and it is also possible to record learner choices and responses to survey questions. The possibilities for data collection will be discussed in various potential scenarios in which a language instructor might work. Most of the techniques can be used for language assessment as well as for CALL research. In addition, the presenter will discuss plans to gain new insights into second language acquisition by means of virtual and augmented reality applications in the new Askwith Kenner Global Languages and Cultures Room, a new space which offers students and the community an immersive, interactive language classroom and learning space.
11: 30 - 11: 5525 mins
B10140 seats
209-PLe Thuy Linh
Individual sessionPoster (60 mins)
Blended learning has gained its momentum in ESL environment as it flourishes the opportunities for language learning and practice, especially at tertiary level. The study aims to explore learner’s perceptions of blended-learning and its relation to face-to-face learning. In addition, the paper examined the challenges emerged in this blended-learning environment through the eyes of learners. Questionnaire was employed in this research to discover the attitude of 200 students. Semi-structured interview was also conducted to deeply understand learner’s perceptions as well as addressed a few major challenges that students of Van Lang University underwent in this blended-learning course. According to the findings, a large number of learners showed positive attitude towards blended learning, stating that they achieved considerable benefits from this ESL blended course. In regards to the interconnection with face-to-face learning, most students were still in favor of face-to-face learning compared to online learning. Last but not least, learners revealed a few main barriers to the successful implementation of blended learning, both externally and internally. The most challenging issue of learners in this research was the sense of isolation (lack of sense of community). Other main difficulties revealed was inadequate instructional support, lack of real-time and sufficient feedbacks, technical issues and the inflexibility of language assessment. In terms of internal problems, learners had to deal with the unfamiliarity of independent learning, including learner autonomy, self-motivation and time management. Lastly, some suggestions for future practices of blended learning was also discussed in the paper.
210-PHiroya Tanaka, Katsuyuki Konno
Individual sessionPoster (60 mins)Application of technology to the language classroom
The researcher has developed a mobile application, DoraCAT, to enable EFL learners to self-regulate their vocabulary learning according to their own study needs. Using DoraCAT, learners can diagnose their vocabulary knowledge to find target words to learn, practice those self-selected target words, and review the words they have practiced on the system. In order to help the learners achieve their own vocabulary learning goals, DoraCAT has a data set of 7,971 words at 19 frequency levels from a Japanese nationwide English proficiency test, Eiken, with sample sentences both in text and in audio. This poster will first introduce basic functions of DoraCAT and how this self-regulated mobile vocabulary learning app changes Japanese EFL learners’ appraisal towards vocabulary learning, especially their expectancies, values, and intentions based on the results of a questionnaire survey at multiple points and their actual learning logs.
11: 30 - 11: 5525 mins
B10240 seats
223-PPenkhae Wongsuriya
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Clear pronunciation is a requirement expected of learners, and therefore, is also an important feature of language instruction. Unfortunately, English pronunciation instruction is challenging for teachers in Thailand as they have not been trained to teach pronunciation skills. This is a significant problem, especially in remote areas, as students typically tend to use Thai speech patterns when speaking English. As a result, most students in such areas are unable to pronounce English fluently and accurately. This paper aimed to 1) investigate the use of mobile applications to enhance areas of pronunciation that cause difficulty for most students, and 2) provide strategies for teachers to cater to students’ learning needs and interests. The paper reported on a study involving twenty-four rural students, obtained through a selected purposive sampling process, who experienced a pedagogical intervention incorporating mobile applications. Pre-intervention and post-intervention test data were obtained, as well as data from the mobile applications and semi-structured interviews. The results showed that mobile applications could help students address challenges associated with pronunciation, even having limited English language ability. Examples will be given of teachers’ and students’ use of mobile applications, their experiences with using them, and the outcomes.
11: 30 - 11: 5525 mins
B10330 seats
224-PNguyen Thi Huynh Loc et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
Digital reading has become increasingly prevalent in tertiary-level EFL settings. To prepare EFL learners to read digital texts effectively for university coursework, it is important for stakeholders to understand the digital-reading challenges that learners currently face. Despite a body of research on digital literacy, little has been done in the context of Vietnamese university programs. This gap led us to explore Vietnamese university English majors’ (a) uses of print and online resources and (b) their reading habits. After devising and piloting an online survey (following Dobler & Eagleton,2015), the survey was sent to a representative sampling of English Departments at public universities across Vietnam. A total of 836 students, from 17 Vietnamese universities, completed the survey. Study findings provide an initial snapshot of the challenges Vietnamese EFL university students encounter when reading digitally, including their limited online information-search skills, their lack of confidence in achieving reading comprehension with e-materials, and unbalanced reading requirements in their academic programs. Study findings can (a) inform classroom emphases, materials development, curricula, and policy with regard to print and digital reading instruction in EFL language courses and English-medium content classes in Vietnam and (b) suggest ways to train lecturers and students in digital literacy.
11: 30 - 11: 5525 mins
C30180 seats
225-PThanh Luan Nguyen
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
The education of ELT preservice teacher s at Vietnamese higher education institutions plays a significant and critical role in ongoing national reforms to improve English teaching pedagogy. The emergence of technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) framework (Mishra & Koehler,2006) has redefined teacher knowledge for the integration of digital media technology. Little research has been conducted about ELT preservice teachers’ perception of the categories of knowledge in their initial education programs, represented as TK (technological knowledge), TCK (technological content knowledge), TPK (technological pedagogical knowledge), and TPACK. As part of a larger study into Vietnamese ELT preservice teachers’ perceptions, this presentation reports on findings from an investigation into how final year ELT preservice teachers perceive these bodies of knowledge education. The study also examines how prepared ELT preservice teachers are for teaching diverse students and contexts the digital media technology. Multiple data sources include surveys, individual interviews, and focus groups. Results reveal ELT preservice teachers' divergent sense of preparedness with reference to the key components of knowledge.
11: 30 - 11: 5525 mins
C303100 seats
226-PSiew Ming Thang
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
Eye-tracking (ET) technology has only recently been used in CALL despite the fact that it has been around for over 100 of years and extensively used in reading research. From my previous presentations of ET research studies at CALL conferences, I found that many delegates were still not sure what ET research were all about, how to conduct research using this technology and the relevance of ET technology to CALL. This presentation hopes to address this gap in knowledge by providing the basic information to help beginners venture into this field. It will begin by giving a brief introduction of what ET technology is and then proceed to explain how CALL research can be conducted using ET technology and at the same time pointing out the strengths and pitfalls of using ET technology in CALL research. Finally, it will describe some studies including some of mine that utilise ET technology to investigate issues related to CALL and how these studies enlighten CALL research.
12: 05 - 12: 3025 mins
12: 05 - 12: 3025 mins
A10240 seats
227-PDaniel Chan
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Foreign language learners tend to lack contact time with their teacher or practice opportunities between classes, and this can hamper their progress or take a toll on learners’ motivation. This paper discusses how WhatsApp as a mobile messaging app – already in use by all course participants – may alleviate some of these problems, while expanding the course beyond the physical confines of the classroom. After presenting its features and affordances that are relevant for mobile language learning (instantaneous one-to-one messaging, group chats, sharing and discussion of texts, images, videos, documents or web links), we will evaluate the perception and use of this app by teachers and students of a university-level French language course. The data, collected through surveys and semi-structured interviews, revealed that (1) students tended to be enthusiastic and convinced about how this simple mobile communication tool is useful and effective for their ubiquitous learning, but that (2) teachers tended to be more reserved and had concerns about intrusion into their private time and space. We will discuss how these challenges can be overcome and whether alternative mobile messaging apps may be adopted to achieve similar outcomes.
12: 05 - 12: 3025 mins
A10330 seats
228-PNguyen Nhat
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
It has been observed that traditional methods (i. e. in-class silent practice) are still dominant in many Vietnamese translation classes at the tertiary level. Therefore, a course applying flipped classroom model with a detailed combination of in-class and out-of-class activities was utilized to teach a Vietnamese-English Translation module. The study aimed to (1) find out the effects of flipped classroom model towards improving learners’ translation achievements, and (2) provide an in-depth insight into how the model could make the teaching-learning process more interesting and meaningful. 40 English-majored junior students at Banking University of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam participated in the study during the second semester of 2018-2019 academic year. Both formative and summative assessments based on a range of criterion-referenced and competence-based instruments were adopted. Results show that a careful design and systematic implementation of the flipped classroom model could enhance learners’ acquisition of different translation sub-competences in a mixed-abilities class.
12: 05 - 12: 3025 mins
B10240 seats
229-PNguyen Thu
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
In recent years, the development of information technology has brought about a lot of positive changes in methods of language teaching and made significant innovations in terms of educational quantity and quality. In learning English speaking skill, it is vital for learners to take a back look to what they did. Through reflection teachers and students are able to not just look on the past experience and made some necessary changes. This paper is aimed to investigate the benefits and challenges of using information technology in Reflective Practice to enhance speaking skill for English major students and find out some technology-assisted strategies to support this. A set of questionnaire and open questions were administered among 60 English major students at Hanoi Law University and 10 teachers from 3 universities who have ever taught English speaking skill. The findings showed that the conscious reflection helped learners in solving the problems in learning speaking skill with the technology-assisted strategies related to Collaborative learning, Experiential learning, Flipped learning, Project-Based Learning, and e-learning through social networks, learning software and websites.
12: 05 - 12: 3025 mins
B10330 seats
230-PTien Mai et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Training language teachers in e-learning environments
In recent years, the emergence of online communities of practice (CoPs) has redefined teacher continuing professional development. Engagement in online CoPs offers opportunities for reflection, knowledge exchange, participant ownership, and social emotion sharing. However, little research has been conducted about the quality and depth of social interactions among Vietnamese EFL teachers while participating in online CoPs. In response to the call for rigorous research featuring the roles of moderators (Tsiotakis & Jimoyiannis,2016), the realities of participants’ contribution (Rensfied et al. ,2018) and quality of teachers’ interactions (Lantz-Andersson et al. ,2018), this study employed a mixed methods research design in analysing Vietnamese EFL teachers’ Facebook groups and conducting an online survey to investigate teachers’ engagement in online CoPs. Facebook was adopted as an online CoP platform because of its popularity in Vietnam - with 60 million users accessing it for about 4 hours a day (Phuong,2018). This presentation focuses on Vietnamese EFL teachers’ engagement as well as their expectations, strategies and perceived benefits regarding online CoPs. Findings shed lights on different realities of three Facebook groups as CoPs from both active and non-active members’ perspectives, and the stakeholders’ embracement of digital configurations to foster sustainable practices in the given context.
12: 05 - 12: 3025 mins
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231-PKaren Price
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
Cameras in our laptops and other devices can be used in combination with special software to analyze how a user might be feeling. This technology is being used more and more by advertisers to analyze where we are looking on our screen, and by educators to learn more about a student’s attention, engagement and sentiment at particular moments in order to regulate and adjust the pace or content of learning materials. The presenter will review relevant research and examples as participants see illustrations of a number of available tools and apps. Our discussion will allow us to reflect together upon some of the challenges and issues the use of such technology invites.
12: 05 - 12: 3025 mins
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232-PLe Hanh
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
During the development of technology in the 4th Industrial Revolution, blended learning has been known as one of the most suitable approaches to renovate teaching methodology, especially in teaching English. Since teachers are the keys to effective implementation of blended learning application in the educational system, it is crucial to understand their perspectives towards applying blended learning in teaching as well as factors challenging them in their applications. This paper is aimed to investigate the perspectives of the teachers applying blended courses in a university in Hanoi and their voices about the main factors currently affecting them. The presenter would like to share the findings from her qualitative research of interviewing 20 ESL teachers about their blended learning applications. Moreover, the findings also reveal some factors affecting the blended learning application listed by the interviewees and some suggestions for teachers on how to apply blended teaching approach effectively.
12: 30 - 13: 5080 mins
12: 30 - 13: 5080 mins
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Day 2: Lunch
Refreshment
Enjoy a meal with fellow delegates in one of the local eateries.
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13: 50 - 14: 1525 mins
13: 50 - 14: 1525 mins
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234-KClaire Siskin
Keynote speechFeatured session
Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is well into its sixth decade. While not always used or well integrated into language learning and teaching, CALL has enjoyed some recognition and popularity. But how is CALL seen in the wider language learning community and in education in general? There seems to be a wide communication gap between CALL specialists and the rest of the world: language teachers, students, educational administrators, and technical support staff. Each of these entities tends to view CALL very differently. There are varying perspectives among CALL practitioners themselves as to the “correct” implementation of CALL, and there is even disagreement about the term “CALL” itself. The lack of precise definitions for common terms such as “e-learning, ” “blended learning, ” “virtual, ” “flipped classroom, ” and “digital natives” adds to the problem. I will explore issues of misperception and suggest a path toward clearing up some of the confusion.
13: 50 - 14: 1525 mins
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235-WEdo Forsythe
Individual sessionWorkshop (60 minutes)
Technology enables teachers to connect their students to peers in other countries for intercultural collaborations. This presentation will demonstrate how the author created a website for conducting an intercultural collaboration between Japanese and American university students and how attendees can follow his example. The presentation will begin by explaining the exchange which has been conducted between Japanese and American university students. Attendees will learn what issues have arisen in the collaboration’s 7-year history and they will create a wiki site on which they can use to host a collaboration of their own. The presenter will provide step-by-step instructions on how to set up the online exchange using a wiki page as an example, with comments about the pros and cons of other platforms which can be used, such as social media, blogs, etc. Attendees will also as learn where to find safe, reliable partners for their students’ interactions in an educational setting. Finally, examples of the presenter’s collaborations and the students’ exchanges will be provided so that attendees can see how rich the exchanges can be. Attendees will be prepared to begin online intercultural collaborations with their students. This workshop is updated from one presented at JALTCALL2015 conference.
13: 50 - 14: 1525 mins
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236-PMei Lin Teoh
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Fostering autonomous learning through technology
Of the four language skills, listening is one which many ESL learners find challenging. Yet listening comprehension is a crucial aspect of students' communication. This paper will share the findings of a study where a PBLL (problem-based language learning) approach was adopted for a listening course. PBLL is an extension of PBL which has been used in various fields of study, such as in medical or business disciplines. This approach introduces learners to “real world” problem which requires a solution, at the beginning and allows the learners to work through the problem, eventually finding a solution to it. The research was carried out with 37 undergraduates in a Malaysian university: experimental group (19), control group (18). The experimental group had to make use of their mobile devices to search for resources online, decide on which resources were relevant in order to solve the problem. They recorded their feedback on their mobile devices and sent the files to their lecturer. Results revealed that PBLL has a significant effect on the learners’ listening comprehension, where they reported a higher chance of new knowledge, active learning and involvement with the learning content, incidental learning, and mutual understanding within the PBLL groups. This study can have pedagogical implications for language teachers, material developers and curriculum designers.
13: 50 - 14: 1525 mins
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237-PYogi Widiawati
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Politeknik Negeri Jakarta (PNJ) is one of state vocational higher institutions in Indonesia which offers a variety of educational programs. It opens diploma 3 and Diploma 4. Based on the decree of Minister of Education, PNJ must serve and facilitate students with special needs. Therefore, it opens Diploma 3 program (Marketing Management) for students for special needs. Mostly, they have IQ below 100 and others are autism. That is why teachers must find the way to teach English (especially in Speaking Lesson) in order they can participate. To assist both teachers and students to learn, using digital comics is one of the teaching methods that English teachers use. Based on CALL, series of comics are made by using the tool of cartoon story maker. By using the application of Comic Creator and Paint Tool, the software is made and it contains some dialogues about some topics, such as: greeting, having holiday, and leisure time. Slow learners and autism students are able to follow the dialogue by repeating it. This will make them enjoyable to learn English. Digital comics are equipped by not only pictures but also sounds to teach them how to pronounce the important words. By doing this way, students find the learning process fun and interesting.
13: 50 - 14: 1525 mins
B10240 seats
238-PCao Thi Xuan Lien
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
This small-scale study focuses on investigating the perceptions of EFL students at a Vietnamese institution, i. e. the University of Foreign Languages, Hue University, about computer-assisted listening assessment. Specifically, the study aims at discovering what students thought about the use of the Moodle Quiz in creating and delivering listening tests. In addition, it is also purported to find out what problems students countered when taking Moodle-based listening quizzes and what can be done to help them overcome those problems. A survey including both closed and open questions was designed and delivered to 73 first-year English majors who participated in the Listening 1 Module and took Moodle listening quizzes for both self-assessment and course assessment purposes. An interview was then conducted to collect deeper responses from 10 of those participants. The findings of the study show that just over half of students liked taking listening tests on the Moodle Quiz while the rest of the students either were indifferent or disliked this method of listening assessment. It is also found out that more students thought that Moodle-based listening quizzes should be used for self-assessment rather than course assessment. In comparison with traditional paper-based listening tests, students pointed out that Moodle Quiz facilitated listening assessment in terms of clear sound, better concentration, and quicker feedback. However, the study results also reveal that the most popular problems which students had when taking listening quizzes on Moodle involved students’ unfamiliarity with the tool, time pressure of the tests and facility-related trouble. Finally, based on students’ responses in the study, some suggestions were also made in order to improve the effectiveness of using Moodle Quiz in the listening assessment.
13: 50 - 14: 1525 mins
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239-PPasaribu Truly
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Current developments in ICT have resulted in a paradigm shift which shapes the future of education. The present study aims at elaborating possible language learning activities using a mobile application called Padlet, an online bulletin board where students can display their thoughts and collaborate with other students. It resembles a whiteboard, but it can be accessed online and used synchronically. This qualitative study involved 26 students from Critical Reading and Writing Class. They used Padlet in their mobile devices to brainstorm, make a mind map, share reading links, ask different kinds of questions, and respond to their friends' questions for further discussion with the on-going class meetings. The study explores the activities in Padlet which encourage students to take active roles in asking different levels of questions using their mobile phones. Besides elaborating the merits of using this app, this study also mentions some drawbacks of using Padlet in the classroom.
13: 50 - 14: 1525 mins
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240-PYuka Ishikawa
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Engineering colleges and institutes in Japan have globalized rapidly in recent years. The number of overseas students, non-Japanese professors and researchers, and lectures delivered in English has drastically increased. Now emphasis is increasingly being put on writing papers in English and some colleges require students to write their theses in English. However, there are few learning materials available for Japanese graduate students to learn how to write an effective abstract. This study analyzes fifty abstracts written by Japanese graduate students majoring in the five major engineering disciplines: chemical engineering, applied physics, material engineering, architecture, and computer science and compare them with fifty abstracts written by professional researchers of the same disciplines, aiming to identify words and phrases overused and underused by graduate students and to develop new learning materials suitable for them. The results show that graduate students tend to use ordinary common words more frequently while they tend to use technical words less frequently than professional researchers. The result of the correspondence analysis suggests that some graduate student groups use the high frequency words in a characteristic way. They also have a tendency to overuse particular sentence structures such as “it is found that” or “it is concluded that”.
13: 50 - 14: 1525 mins
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241-PDanyang Zhang
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
Profiting from the development of mobile-assisted language learning (MALL), flexible and convenient mobile-based dictionaries (MBDs) have become increasingly popular in China. According to Miller and Wu (2018, p.7), “much more attention needs to be given to how students use strategies in their informal mobile learning”. This study aims to explore how Chinese EFL learners use different types of MBDs while reading. In total,66 English majors and 59 non-English majors participated, completing a self-report questionnaire and a semi-structured interview. Data from the questionnaire show that participants generally prefer to look up the definition of words, especially the first definition and the Chinese translation. In comparison, non-English majors used MBDs more intensively than English majors, particularly to identify word spelling, part of speech and Chinese translations. Participants in the bilingualised group using MBDs more actively than the other two groups, but they preferred to only read one definition. According to the interview responses, participants’ various MBD strategies, by and large, correlate with their majors, language proficiency, learning needs, current language learning task type and task difficulty. The results of this study reflect the distinctive personalised feature of MALL (Kukulska-Hulme,2012) and offer some theoretical and practical insights into this field.
14: 25 - 14: 5025 mins
14: 25 - 14: 5025 mins
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242-PPham Thuan
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
With the emergence of new technologies English teacher have more opportunities to support their English teaching practice. This paper presents the results of a small-scale case study on how the application of Google Classroom and Google Forms benefit students in learning English as a foreign language. A broad view of the functionalities of Google Classroom as a learning management system is provided and the uses of Google Forms for practice and assessment are described as well. The implementation of the two learning-enhanced tools was conducted within a whole semester of 15 weeks at a provincial university in the north of Vietnam. Thirty-four first year non-English majors participated in the study. To collect the data, in-class observation, assignment analysis, a questionnaire, and semi-structured interviews were employed. The findings revealed that Google Classroom and Google Forms are effective and applicable technological tools for teaching and learning in the EFL context. The students exhibits positive attitude towards English; higher level of autonomy in the learning process; and better computer literacy. Pedagogical implications and difficulties encountered are also discussed in the last section the article.
14: 25 - 14: 5025 mins
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243-PHa Nguyen
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Fostering autonomous learning through technology
Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) is a multiple-focus approach that allows for the simultaneous teaching of content and language, underpinned by the 4Cs framework (Content, Communication, Cognition, Culture). In the light of this approach and the corresponding framework, a subtitling project was experimented by a small group of fourth-year students at the University of Languages and International Studies - Vietnam National University, Hanoi, who were offered to do a specialised course called Topics in British Studies: The Invention of Childhood. The students were instructed to work in groups to find approximately one-hour-long un-subbed documentaries on Youtube, produce their own subtitles and organise in-class activities to present their collective outcome and obtained information to their peers. The survey conducted after the course showed the students' positive reception of the project, fine appreciation to most of the 4Cs components and constructive feedback on the problems they encountered. The task, however, did generate questions regarding the appropriate assessment and beneficiaries. Based on the students' survey and the teacher's observation, suggestions would be made for future applications of this integrating, autonomy-fostering and technology-based assignment.
14: 25 - 14: 5025 mins
B10240 seats
244-PKeanwah Lee et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
This paper reports on a study which explores the effectiveness of using the Nearpod Interactive software to enhance a Private University students’ learning experiences and satisfaction in large lecture classes. Nearpod allows instructors to create interactive presentations to provide synchronized learning experiences to students' mobile devices (BYOD), while allowing students to actively partake in activities like polls, quizzes, and interactions. Using a questionnaire and focus group interviews, students’ learning experiences and perceptions were elicited after undergoing a semester of classes with Nearpod Interactive presentation software. A convenient sample of 158 students from Science, Engineering & Education disciplines participated in the study. Survey data showed a moderate effect on the students’ learning experiences and perception. However, interviews data were predominantly positive, particularly in providing opportunities for active participation, interaction, sharing of opinions and peer checking of answers. Nearpod also provided opportunities for instructors to synchronously monitor, clarify, provide feedback, and incorporate interaction and discussion amongst the students. Thus, Nearpod is seen as a viable alternative for instructors to add value to their teaching and learning, while enhancing the learning experience and satisfaction of fees-paying students.
14: 25 - 14: 5025 mins
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245-PShin'ichiro Ishikawa
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
What difference is seen in monologues and dialogues by L2 English learners in Asia? Using the International Corpus Network of Asian Learners of English (ICNALE) (Ishikawa,2018), which includes topic-controlled spoken and written outputs of learners in ten countries and regions in Asia as well as English native speakers, we compared learners' and native speakers' fluency and lexical quality in two kinds of oral outputs. Our quantitative analyses have shown that Japanese learners, for example, speak approx. 68 words per minute in monologues, but they usually speak less in dialogues. This seems to reflect that learners tend to be less fluent in oral interactions, which require smoother on-line L2 processing and therefore put greater information processing loads on speakers. Interestingly enough, however, this kind of decrease is not necessarily observed with all learners in Asia. Investigating the monologue-dialogue gaps will give a hint for designing a better ELT methodology to help learners with particular L1 backgrounds to be more flexible and autonomous speakers.
14: 25 - 14: 5025 mins
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246-PHaslindah Syarifuddin et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
The Fourth Industrial Revolution (IR 4.0) as expected, change the way we live, work, communicate and of course, learn! It is also likely to change the things we value and the way we value them in the future. Presently, we can already see the changes in business models and employment trends. Following the Fourth Industrial Revolution (IR 4.0), this action research studies the students’ attitudes, when information and communication technology (ICT) is embedded in their English learning. A class consisting of 34 students in a public primary school, in Malaysia, were the participants of this action research. It is conducted in the second half of 2017. In this study, teacher incorporates gamification; an interactive, practical and fun approach in her English lesson; in which she uses many apps available both online and offline. All the activities / gamification; then will be assigned to the students via Frog VLE (Virtual Learning Environment) as the main platform. Teacher creates a student-centred learning in where the students are the main user of the technology while the teacher uses it to promote blended learning. The action research also aimed to explore how a teacher uses technology in the classroom and make her students ready for the 21st century demands. Teacher and students use Frog VLE in their English classroom, then associated it in their everyday life’s (flipped classroom). Ultimately, the study will show the students’ increasing interest and motivation in learning the English language as well as their proficiency level in English.
14: 25 - 14: 5025 mins
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247-PWei Keong Too et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Training language teachers in e-learning environments
M-learning refers to learning that is facilitated by mobile devices in a flexible environment that can be accessed anywhere and anytime (Ozdamli & Cavus,2011; Kukulska-Hulme & Shield,2008; Cobcroft et. al. 2006). This study aims to examine Malaysian public school English language teachers’ perceptions towards M-learning by answering the following research questions: 1) What are the perceptions of Malaysian public school English language teachers on m-learning? ; 2) To what extent are Malaysian public school English language teachers ready to integrate mobile technology in their classrooms? ; and 3) What are the measures that need to be taken by Malaysian public school English language teachers to successfully implement m-learning in their classrooms? The study adopted the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) proposed by Venkatesh et. al. (2003) to gauge the perceptions of 48 English language public school teachers. By using an explanatory mixed method research approach using a questionnaire and semi-structured interview, the findings revealed that the teachers had positive attitude towards and were keen on adopting mobile learning in their classrooms. However, they requested trainings on the implementation of this learning mode.
15: 00 - 15: 5050 mins
15: 00 - 15: 5050 mins
Hall A300 seats
248-KCynthia White
Keynote speechKeynote (50 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Technology and globalization have transformed how we communicate and how we use language in professional, personal, educational and public domains. For language teachers these ongoing changes raise questions about what they do in their classrooms and how they respond to policy and curricular initiatives in terms of CALL. These changes also raise fundamental questions for our understanding of language learning and teaching in the digital age: how do teachers choose to act in using technology? how have new tools transformed their practices? how do they interpret and use the CALL experiences they encounter? In this talk using a wide range of recent examples I will show how the concept of agency allows us to gain insight into not only the realities of CALL practice but also the ways in which teachers seek to bring together local practices, virtual spaces and global forces within their CALL classrooms.
15: 50 - 16: 2030 mins
15: 50 - 16: 2030 mins
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Day 2: Afternoon refreshment break
Refreshment
Enjoy a break in the refreshment area.
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16: 20 - 16: 4525 mins
16: 20 - 16: 4525 mins
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250-WPhilip Morris, Jonny Western
Individual sessionWorkshop (60 minutes)Fostering autonomous learning through technology
The segmental pronunciation differences between Vietnamese and English tend to be well known among EFL teachers within Vietnam and the phonemic sounds are often a focus from day one. However, the resulting drawback is a lack of time spent on suprasegmental instruction (including stress and intonation, tempo, resonance, rhythm, pitch and volume) which studies have found to be more effective in improving intelligibility than segmental instruction alone (Derwing and Munro,2015, p. 9, Gregersen in Arabski and Wojtaszek (eds),2011, ch.11). Mastery of suprasegmental pronunciation is notoriously difficult requiring the time and commitment which is rarely available in classroom hours. However, as young learners in particular become more deliberate and autonomous in their use of technology to study new languages, mobile phones and devices can be used by teachers to enhance motivation, foster autonomy and support learners to individualise their learning experience (Lamb,2019). In this practical workshop, participants will be introduced to freely available resources to independently practice stress, rhythm and intonation in English with their own mobile device. This method was trialed with a group of English language learners in Danang by firstly drawing the students' attention to distinct suprasegmental differences between Vietnamese and English through an online voice recording tool. Learners were then introduced to techniques to notice suprasegmental pronunciation features in short audio scripts and to practice reproducing the pronunciation features.
16: 20 - 16: 4525 mins
A10240 seats
251-WMinh Nguyen
Individual sessionWorkshop (60 minutes)
How often has a teacher had to pause in a lesson to deal with a problem child? How many times in their teaching career have they had to remind a student who has not submitted their homework? What if there was an answer to every question that was raised, would it be interesting to find out? I strongly believe if a teacher has a certain amount of time and a strong wish to transform their classroom into a positive learning environment, they should have a closer look at this tool. In this workshop, participants are able to learn about how to use Classcraft - the best classroom management tool that was created by a Canadian teacher with the aim to motivate young learners and reinforce their good behavior in school. This is a computerized role-playing game in which the students are teamed up and earn points depending on how they behave and perform in classwork and homework. Besides that, students can also have a discussion, upload assignments and easily find the learning materials used in class. In short, C lasscraft is a solution to incorporate everything you need into one place.
16: 20 - 16: 4525 mins
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252-PGiao Chi Le
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
The introduction of Internet and the emergence of available web resources have facilitated endless efforts by language teachers to do research in language patterns. Web resources in general and corpus tools in particular have enabled large samples of language to be explored for better insights into the nature of language in use in all its forms and its uses. While corpora are generally inclined to the work of lexicographers whose job is to inform dictionaries or grammar books, arguments may have arisen around why such end-users as language teachers and learners cannot make use of these innovative tools. This paper adds to this on-going debate by discussing approaches to using corpora as a reference point for language teaching and research. It shows potentials of manipulating common data-driven web tools for research in language patterns and explores some pathways for language teachers to explore aspects of language in use through authentic texts. Results revealed from corpus search via COCA and BNC and generalizations made from the manipulated data - grammatical metaphor in this case - can further showcase the inexhaustible implications of using web resources for enhanced language teaching and research.
16: 20 - 16: 4525 mins
B10140 seats
253-PLee Kok Yueh et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Training language teachers in e-learning environments
The importance of ongoing teacher development through self-reflection has been a recurring theme in language education. Existing research has highlighted how teachers and student teachers collect information about their own teaching and examine their individual classroom practices (Richards & Lockhart,1996; Farrell,2015,2019), with data comprising journals, lesson reports and audio or video recordings. This paper contributes to this body of research by considering a corpus approach to promoting teacher reflection. Specifically, the study to be reported in this paper demonstrates how a computer-assisted analysis of a corpus of written feedback enables an EAP instructor to study and understand her own feedback practices. A collection of 144 teacher feedback notes for first-year students at a university was analyzed using the corpus tool, WordSmith. Results suggest the use of specific expressions by the instructor and reveal how her feedback practices were often expressed through the use of hedging and modal verbs. Whilst the feedback was predominantly positively expressed and delivered, some comments in the negative form were also observed. The instructor’s reflection on her own practices is discussed. The paper concludes by recommending corpus approaches to self-reflection in teacher professional development, while offering some notes of caution in doing so.
16: 20 - 16: 4525 mins
B10240 seats
254-PWan Lei
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Abstract: In the digital era, CALL (Computer-assisted Language Learning) has been increasingly applied in English reading teaching as a modern pedagogical technique. Compared with the traditional teacher-oriented teaching mode, English reading course in CALL mode has stimulated learners' reading interest, improved learner autonomy in reading and increased teaching efficiency. This paper explores the features of CALL, its increasing application and impact on English reading teaching, and its predictable prospects as well. The features of CALL in English reading teaching are discussed from the following aspects: diversity; multimodality; personalization; learner autonomy; multi-interactivity; timely feedback; and automatic evaluation system. The presenter does a tentative research on CALL by studying intelligent English teaching systems, such as MOOCs; Coursera, edX, etc. and analyses the data obtained from a reading teaching experiment in CALL mode, showing that subjects in the experiment group has made statistical progress in terms of reading comprehension, attitude, interest and self-efficacy. Finally, how to improve CALL performance is discussed in terms of the optimization of ELT-related network; learners’ computer literacy; and improving teachers’ CALL-related ELT competence and so on.
16: 20 - 16: 4525 mins
B10330 seats
255-PVo Loan
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Localizing Internet materials to the classroom
This paper introduces a novel approach; called Subject Content based Approach (SCA), to design the English curriculum for IT students at Phu Yen University (PYU). Our approach adopted three prototypes of Content-Based Instruction model (CBI) used to teach foreign language including Theme-based instruction, Sheltered instruction and Adjunct instruction. Content instructors are required to utilize Group-based flipped classroom model to perform our curriculum. Course contents relate to academic subjects, language’s requirements for IT profession and current trends in IT. Most topics are selected openly from both textbook and online courses in Computer Science such as Coursera, Open University and IBM. Since 2016, we have applied SCA to teach for full time undergraduates who either haven’t got a job or already have jobs at PYU. The results show that the implementation of SCA motivated and enhanced student’s self-study attitude about learning English and achieved higher scores on exams. That benefits learners in term of learning English for academic purposes and their future careers.
16: 20 - 16: 4525 mins
C30180 seats
256-PRobert (Bob) Gettings
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Most EFL writing training is intensive, with a focus on accuracy, editing and style. Timed extensive writing, on the other hand, has a focus on fluency, quantity and variety. Students write a lot, in a variety of genres, about a multitude of topics in order to quickly express their ideas the best they can. Timed extensive writing emphasizes communication of ideas and the completion of a large number of shorter writing tasks, usually from five to thirty minutes each. Since timed extensive writing moves away from the traditional emphasis on accuracy, editing and grading, traditional teacher, student and institutional attitudes towards EFL writing have to change in order to make the approach successful. Teachers, in particular, have to solve the problem of managing, giving feedback and evaluating many more EFL writing tasks than in a traditional program. CALL offers a variety of ways of solving this problem. This presentation will review approaches to timed extensive writing and describe ways that Moodle and Google documents can be used to manage extensive writing programs. Participants will be encouraged to test, download and share EFL writing instructional materials from the presenter’s website.
16: 20 - 16: 4525 mins
C303100 seats
257-PHea-Suk Kim
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Research has emphasized the centrality of student-centered learning activating students' ability to generate and refine the meaning of learning (Hannafin & Land,1997). Technology, including computers and mobile devices, allows learners to expand their learning experiences in self-regulating and efficient ways. As mobile technology in particular has developed, educators have employed mobile devices to enhance the learning environment. It is clear that mobile devices can be effective to experience learning, which may explain why the role of mobile technology has been significantly increasing in foreign language learning classrooms. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of using Kahoot! on grammar learning for college students. The research questions are as follows: 1) Will the use of Kahoot! have an effect on grammar learning? 2) Do college students have a positive view towards the use of Kahoot! in English grammar classes? This study consisted of 50 college students who enrolled in the course College English in the spring semester of 2018. Most of the students were freshmen and they were divided into two classes in different time slots. All the students received the same instruction throughout the course and practiced grammar as well as speaking and listening. A grammar test consisting of 40 questions was administered in the pre-stage. All the participants were taught using the same materials. The grammar practice tests used in each class were collected from TOEIC books. They were distributed to the students either in handouts or in online quiz forms, using Kahoot! . After the semester, the participants took a post-test to compare mean scores within and between the groups. A survey including 15 close-ended questions and two open-ended questions was administered to discover the participants' attitudes and ideas regarding the use of Kahoot! to expand their learning experience. According to the results of the paired sample t -tests, there were significant differences in grammar learning between the pre- and the post-tests. It was proven that both groups improved their grammar after the course. However, the students using Kahoot! in class did not show any significant differences compared to those in the traditional group. According to the survey, the students using Kahoot! showed positive attitudes towards their use of Kahoot! and reported on their positive experience with it in language learning. Based on the findings, the current study recommended the necessity of facilitating mobile-based learning activities in learning English grammar to bring students’ involvement in classes and help with learning outcomes. Also, the researcher suggested that further studies should be conducted regarding the effectiveness of using Kahoot! on different English language skills.
16: 55 - 17: 2025 mins
16: 55 - 17: 2025 mins
A10330 seats
258-PLayhuah Goh
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
In the Malaysian Higher Education landscape, online education and traditional face to face instruction offer both ICT-free past and an ICT-aware future (Laurillard,2009) university students a vast array of teaching and learning styles. Even though the effects of ICT and their influence are prevalent in all aspects of the current generation learners’ life, there were uncertainties when the idea of blended learning was mooted to a group of undergraduates who came from a traditional classroom environment. Blended learning offers a good balance between face-to-face and technology-mediated activities and should thereforebe an acceptable transition towards full online instruction as intended by the Education 4.0 policy in the country. This study examined how a group university students handled online learning for the first time, using the blended learning approach. The study approached the learners’ experience from a change perspective. The CBAM diagnostic dimensions were used to analyse their ambivalence and answers sought to explain their reception of this experience. A mixed method design was employed to collect data on the students’ perception and experience of blended learning. A research of this nature is significant in providing an insight into the preparations for learner readiness from traditional classroom instruction towards online learning.
16: 55 - 17: 2025 mins
B10140 seats
259-PNguyen Ngoc Vu
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
The approaching industrial revolution 4.0 is bringing drastic changes in many fields and these changes have strong impact on English language education in Vietnam recently. This presentation discusses some trends already available in Vietnam like using robot to teach English, virtual reality technology, machine translation and mobile learning. The presentation also showcases platforms powered with artificial intelligence which utilize students’ devices and feature interactive video contents in online language courses. Data for this study include learner activity logs and course dedication time report from an online language course with 50 participants. From the analysis, the author makes suggestions for technology investment and language education in Vietnam.
16: 55 - 17: 2025 mins
B10240 seats
260-PPham Thi Phuong
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Facebook has emerged as a prominent social network among the Vietnamese youth, surpassing any other kinds of social networks. It is potential to be effective in improving oral communication skill, especially their fluency; however, scant attention has been paid to the use of Facebook groups for enhancing speaking skill for EFL students. Thus, this study is to find out possible effects and factors that hinder the success of incorporation of Facebook in speaking skill and suggest solutions to cooperate it in the context of credit programme productively. Students at Thuongmai University were asked to join and post their 5-minute-English speech video assignments on their classes' Facebook groups. After the intervention, students answered the Likert-scale questionnaires about the barriers to the successful use of Facebook in practising speaking skill and their level of assignment fulfilment. Data analysed with regression method by SPSS 20. along with the interviews from teachers showed that the major factor is related to students who are anxious in posting their videos. The non-inclusion of ICT usage in the curriculum comes second and teachers' readiness and culture come next. Therefore, the stakeholders should find ways to lessen students anxiety, and augment curricula with ICT usage.
16: 55 - 17: 2025 mins
B10330 seats
261-PWirawati, Yi Xe Ngui
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Portfolios have long been used as a form of alternative assessment in language classrooms. In the present day, the use of e-Portfolios (electronic portfolios) is becoming more relevant as compared to conventional paper portfolios. This study aimed to explore the extent to which an e-Portfolio assessment contributed to the attainment of academic writing from the learners’ perspectives. A total of 48 undergraduate students who were enrolled in an English Language course in Universiti Malaysia Sabah participated in this study. Throughout the course, the students were required to respond to SWOT analysis in small groups in order to identify any emerging issues. The students were also required to fill in an open-ended questionnaire at the end of the course in order to explore their experience of using the e-Portfolio. To obtain more detailed information,18 students from the sample were selected for an interview based on their academic writing results. The findings showed that the students experienced difficulty adapting to the e-Portfolio in the beginning of the course. In general, a majority of the students believed that certain features within the e-Portfolio helped them to become better writers. A majority of the students also concurred that the e-Portfolio should continue to be implemented as part of the course.
16: 55 - 17: 2025 mins
C30180 seats
262-PMyung Jeong Ha
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
Smartphones have become so popular that mobile learning has been adopted by a large number of schools and universities throughout the world. Although mobile applications for content learning purposes are available, many mobile applications are mainly used for out-of-class learning activities or individual learning. The key to the effective use of smartphones is their use embedded in classroom practice. The present study thus investigated the student perspectives based on their in-class experience on using a mobile Learner Response System (LRS), Socrative. 82 university students who enrolled in the American Culture course participated in the study. The research questions are: 1) Does the use of a mobile LRS in blended learning affect students’ interaction in the classroom? 2) What are student’s perspectives on using a mobile LRS, Socrative, in big classrooms regarding activities and features? 3) What are the advantages and disadvantages of using a mobile LRS in university lectures? Both qualitative and quantitative methods, specifically, a questionnaire and interviews were used to collect data. The survey was conducted at the end of semester regarding student perspectives of using Socrative to review the class materials and develop team-based discussions. In order to triangulate data, focus group interviews were performed. The main findings are as follows. First, students’ perspectives on Socrative were positive across the board. They found the use of Socrative to be positive, particularly for ‘Shared Individual Opinion’, ‘Increased Participation’, and ‘Interacting with Teacher’. Second, students preferred to use Socrative to check comprehension and to submit responses for group discussions. Third, students considered instant interaction and hidden identity to be the strengths. However, having to use cellular data and lack of WiFi signal strength and WiFi range were considered weaknesses in using a mobile LRS in big classrooms. Based on the findings, recommendations for classroom use and further studies are provided.
16: 55 - 17: 2025 mins
C303100 seats
263-PTran Tin Nghi et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Chatbots or artificially intelligent conversational tools are the automatically new tools designed to interact with humans and computers. The tool of chatbot system is very effective in marketing and launching new products. Using chatbot as a tool of learning with logical sequences of cognition has attracted a lot of attention from many foreign language centers, such as VUS, ILA, etc. This research is conducted to apply AI chatbot for helping students to learn a specific knowledge of a foreign language. The research also discusses students’ interests and engagements, and performances in two ways of learning: with and without the help of AI chatbot via the case of teaching some English prepositions. 200 students were selected and divided into experimental and control groups (100 students for each respectively). The purpose of this empirical experiment was to test whether or not the AI chatbot is effective and useful for enhancing students’ performance and engagement in learning a specific point of a foreign language. With the preliminary results, the students benefited a lot from a new learning experience with the use of AI chatbot in teaching. Most of them perceived AI chatbot tools as an essential part of their learning process. The AI chatbot also generated excitement and fun for their learning. The research may open up a field for language teachers to explore and apply for their teaching in the digital era.
17: 30 - 18: 0030 mins
17: 30 - 18: 0030 mins
A10140 seats
Day 2: PacCALL Annual general meeting (AGM)
Ceremonial event
abc
19: 00 - 21: 00120 mins
Aug 10th (Sat)
08: 00 - 09: 0060 mins
08: 00 - 09: 0060 mins
A10140 seats
Day 3: Registration
Registration
Here we go for the 3rd and final day of the conference.
A10140 seats
A10240 seats
A10330 seats
B10140 seats
B10240 seats
B10330 seats
09: 00 - 09: 2525 mins
09: 00 - 09: 2525 mins
A10140 seats
302-PHồ Thư, Hoà Phan Văn
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
Emphasizing the close relationship between the process of learning and that of cognition, cognitive science considers bodily experiences as fundamental for learning. Several researchers have discussed the intervention of embodiment in the processes of learning and teaching. In the context that traditional educational paradigms have still been dominating in Vietnam, in order to propose a motion of English learning and teaching innovation in the classroom, this paper tries to review the significance of embodied learning and its role in the process of learning languages. Then, some suggestions will be made in the hope of bettering the effectiveness of learning and teaching English in the classroom. Accordingly, the paper will include 2 main parts. The first part is the place for the theory of embodied cognition that affirms the close relationship between thinking, acting and learning (Wilson,2002; McClelland et al,2014). Several evidences show that bodily experience is crucial to language acquisition, both capacities of comprehension and production (Barsalou,1999; Buccino & Mezzadri,2015; Fischer & Zwaan,208; Glenberg & Lakoff,2005; Jirak et al,2010; Lakoff,1987). The second part is reserved for embodied learning, some suggestions concerning learning and teaching English in the classroom. One of the methods will be presented here is the project-based learning in which students are believed to acquire a deeper knowledge through active exploration of real-world challenges and problems. Also, the computer-based approach to English learning will be discussed along with the roles of technology, an indispensable part in this way of English learning and teaching.
09: 00 - 09: 2525 mins
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303-PLuu Quy Khuong et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Web Resources for TESOL 2018, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License, on americanenglish. state. gov introduces many useful websites for English language teaching and learning around the world. However, this paper focuses on exploring and applying part 1 “Teaching the four skills” in English lessons to improve 4 language skills for high school students, especially those at Nguyen Thai Hoc High School in Binh Dinh province, Vietnam. The results showed that the application of some websites from the web resources for TESOL 2018 to English lessons like ESL Discussions (http: //esldiscussions. com), ESL Video (http: //www. eslvideo. com/), Breaking News English ( www. breakingnewsenglish. com, Marking Mate ( http: //readingandwritingtools. com/mm/markingmate. html ) and many others, has been very effective for both students and teachers. First, this teaching method greatly promoted not only students’ English communicative competence but their ability of exploring, self-studying, and accumulating knowledge from huge Internet resources. Second, the websites from Web Resources helped improve teachers’ creativity and flexibility in their teaching process. In addition, teachers were not tied to the current knowledge of a lesson, they learned more about other issues and aspects related to the lesson topic instead. Third, with images, sound, animation, . . . from the webs, teachers could build lively lectures to attract the attention of students and provide them with many opportunities to practice their language skills. Finally, the interaction between teachers and students was much enhanced.
09: 00 - 09: 2525 mins
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304-PThi Phuong Thao Mai et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Using the Internet for cultural exchange
With an aim to assessing and developing intercultural competence (IC) in tertiary education, this research is to use FLipgrid, a type of video discussion platform to conduct a cultural exchange program among Vietnamese non-English major students with Azerbaijani and African students (from several countries of Africa). The research procedure involves having students, via 10 tasks, first answer the instructors' questions, elicit proverbs in their native languages and discuss the meanings using English as a lingua franca, then listen to at least two videos from the other two countries and reply to them. The data collection tools include questionnaire surveys as quantitative method and in-depth interview based on those of Fantini (2006) (as qualitive method) recorded in flipgrid videos as case studies to assess their enhancement in Intercultural Competence. The findings showed that students' knowledge, attitude, skills and behaviours (four main dimensions of IC) regarding other cultures' beliefs, values and practices improves significantly by the end of the program. Also, the transcriptions from the videos indicated that students had better listening skills in English resulting from having listened extensively to different accents in different countries. Additionally, they were able to articulate a complex understanding of cultural differences, which were paid more attention to than cultural similarities because they could interpret intercultural experience from the perspectives of both one's own and one's faraway peers' worldviews.
09: 00 - 09: 2525 mins
B10140 seats
305-PSusan Sun
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Training language teachers in e-learning environments
The design of learning tasks in computer-assisted language learning (CALL) - CALL task design for short - is a daily activity for many language teachers. This paper explains how CALL task design may benefit from adopting a patterns-based learning design approach, to help practitioners with capturing, expressing, sharing, learning, and re-using design knowledge. Building on previous research, the paper aims to explore and establish an inventory for a CALL pattern language, which is an organisational system: (1) consisting of various categories or collections of task designs in the format of design patterns, and (2) capturing and representing the (sometimes intricate) relationships and connections within and across different patterns and categories. To build such an inventory, this paper uses results from literature searches to establish significant aspects and features of CALL tasks design. It also draws on the wider educational design literature to explain current conceptions of learning design tasks, activities and principles. Building on the synthesis of these ideas, the inventory, as a conceptual design framework for a CALL pattern language, is developed and described. The paper concludes with a call for the CALL community to engage collaboratively in research and discussion that can extend the patterns-based design approach.
09: 00 - 09: 2525 mins
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306-PBin Zou, Sara Liviero
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
This study explores university students’ perceptions of computer-assisted language learning (CALL); in particular, the potential of Artificial Intelligence (AI)-assisted mobile applications (apps) to support the development of speaking skills in assessed courses of English for Academic Purposes (EAP) in international Chinese Higher Education. This exploratory mixed methods study first surveyed higher education (HE) students’ perceptions of AI for EAP Speaking Skills needs and experiences. A second qualitative phase consisted in interviewing selected students on themes that emerged from the survey. The results of this study identified the absence of EAP assessment-focused AI applications in the Chinese market; moreover, that currently available apps are perceived as lacking accurate voice recognition and assessment-relevant feedback, and as expensive and dependent on network availability and range. The study contributes to an international focus on integrating real-time, assessment-relevant feedback technology with evidence-based pedagogical approaches to teaching EAP speaking skills, by documenting Chinese student perceived needs of EAP teaching and learning.
09: 00 - 09: 2525 mins
B10330 seats
307-PTan Choon Keong
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
Gamification is a creative method that involves the design of gameplay elements in a non-gaming context where learners are required to be engaged in problem-solving (De-Marcos et al. ,2014). The purpose of this case study was to gauge whether games are able to improve the number of words learnt. A total of 72 secondary school students from the Kota Kinabalu District, Sabah, Malaysia played two android-based apps for language learning, namely Duolingo (puzzle category) and Word Search Game with Levels (education category) every day for two weeks. The vocabulary tested was for the topics occupation and transportation respectively. The researchers recorded the number of vocabularies learnt after each round of the game. To survey gaming elements and satisfaction of players, the 7-element game model proposed by Sylke et al. (2012) was used. At the end of Week 2, a checklist regarding the 7-element model was given. The measured game elements were fun or enjoyability, rules, goals and objectives, interaction, outcomes and feedback, problem solving/competition/challenge and representation/context. Findings showed that Duolingo lacked elements such as interaction (45.9%), problem solving (80.2%) and context (56.8%) while Word Search Game with Levels lacked interaction (60%) and outcomes (52.6%). In term of number of words learnt, Word Search Game with Levels was better because the game focus is on word search. The level of game satisfaction was 85.6% ( Duolingo ) and 93.4% ( Word Search Game with Levels ) respectively. The researchers suggest that gamification approach for language learning should be encouraged in secondary school students.
09: 25 - 09: 4520 mins
09: 25 - 09: 4520 mins
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Day 3: Morning refreshment break
Refreshment
Enjoy a break in the refreshment area.
09: 45 - 10: 1025 mins
09: 45 - 10: 1025 mins
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308-WNguyễn Thị Thu Thủy
Individual sessionWorkshop (60 minutes)
English speaking skill is considered the most critical skill for language learners to integrate into the globe. However, Vietnamese students find it hard to reach a competent speaking level. The size of a conventional class gives students less chances to practice speaking. Moreover, the lack of encouraging environment and the lack of demand for students’ active engagement in their own learning demotivate students and hinder students from achieving their fluency and proficiency in English speaking skill. Therefore, it is crucial for teachers to apply the another teaching method to amplify the students’ speaking practice opportunities inside and outside the classroom as well as foster autonomous learning through technology. This study is to investigate how smart class can solve the challenges faced by English–major students in a Vietnamese university. The data obtained from the survey with 100 students, individual interviews with lecturers. The findings show that students’ speaking skill improves a lot through activities like conversation pairing, oral recording, pronunciation, activities for both in–class and self–access assignment.
09: 45 - 10: 1025 mins
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309-PNguyen Van Long
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Emerging technologies
Due to the rapid development of social networks, their users have many opportunities to communicate through technologies with different people regardless of where they are, what they do, which level they possess, even some culture they belong to. Numerous benefits that social networks bring out are not only worldwide connection through the Internet but also a favourable communicative channel. Especially, social networks become an effective tool for language learners to actively practise the language skills at any time as long as it is suitable to their expectations (to read, to write, to listen, or even to speak with their microphone) and their likes (related to favourite topics). From the viewpoint of language teachers, social networks are an ideal source for introducing to their students. Besides, they are a fruitful channel to update cultural knowledge and practical language trends in online communication. It is also helpful for teachers to supervise some language progress of their students. This paper will report on English use in American universities’ Facebook pages to point out several notices which language teachers and learners should consider in language teaching and learning. This is a preliminary finding for further research towards developing a new language teaching-learning method under the influence of technological expansion.
09: 45 - 10: 1025 mins
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310-PNguyen My
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Nowadays, most English teachers have widely applied Communicative Language Teaching activities (the CLT activities) in English classrooms as a foreign language (EFL) because of their outstanding effectiveness. In EFL classrooms of mixed – level learners and large class sizes, some of the learners may, however, obtain more benefits from these activities than others while speaking English. Some critics have also argued that the CLT activities are not sufficient enough to acquire a target language (L2) because they are implemented only within a monolingual community. This study aimed to explore the advantages and disadvantages of the CLT activities in teaching English speaking skills; evaluate the effectiveness of the integration of computer and smartphone assistants in the CLT activities to motivate learners to speak English. In this study, data was collected from sixty Vietnamese learners in classes at the Center for English as a foreign language in the Ho Chi Minh City of Vietnam. Using a mixed method design, this study deployed a range of data collection methods including the template training session, online questionnaire, observation, and semi-structured interviews which were conducted with a focus group of ten learners. The findings revealed that despite many benefits for strongly raising learner’s motivations to speak English in EFL classrooms, the CLT activities had problems due to lower-level and unmotivated learners. Interestingly, the findings also suggested that the integration of computer and smartphone assistants in the CLT activities not only facilitates the linguistic environment for English speaking practice out of the class but also enhances the learners’ English speaking ability.
09: 45 - 10: 1025 mins
B10140 seats
311-PCuong Pham
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Utilization of information and communication technology (ICT) in learning and teaching has become a prevailing practice in language education. However, the level of ICT adoption is contingent on an array of elements, with the teachers’ willingness to integrate it into their teaching and digital literacy being among the primary concern. Drawing on the construct of agency, this study aims to explore the extent to which language teachers appraise the availability of digital resources and regulate the level of adoption in their teaching. A narrative frame was employed to obtain the perspectives and agentive utilization of ICT of three language teachers (two female and one male) working at three different universities in Ho Chi Minh City. They were invited to reflect on their ICT experiences at three different stages: pre-adoption, actual adoption and future projections. Findings show that all the three participants complimented on the versatility of technology in terms of resources and opportunities for language practice within and beyond the classroom. Major challenges confronting these teachers involve their adaptation to ICT, intensive personal efforts and time constraints. This paper concludes with implications for teachers and education stakeholders in terms of policies and approaches to ICT in language learning and teaching.
09: 45 - 10: 1025 mins
B10240 seats
312-PSuzan Stamper
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
In this session, the presenter will share activities and tools used in a Composition through Literature course at a Hong Kong community college focusing on Early Childhood Education (ECE). In the spirit of the "learning through play" philosophy promoted by the school's ECE lecturers, the presenter focused on incorporating into the course playful language learning activities with poetry, especially activities to build language proficiency and develop vocabulary. The presentation will begin with an introduction to the college and its students. Then, the presenter will describe the course lessons related to the reading and writing of poetry. The presenter will share an example of a course HyperDoc (which is an interactive digital lesson using Google apps) and tools used for various activities like building vocabulary, brainstorming, and making Word Clouds. For poetry writing, the presenter will share samples of templates for writing original poems and also the students' final presentation of their poems in a class PowerPoint.
09: 45 - 10: 1025 mins
B10330 seats
313-PDieu B. Nguyen et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
This case study was developed to understanding preservice teachers’ perceptions of their abilities to integrate technology into teaching practice and how these abilities improved over a course entitled “Technology in Education”. The research was implemented at a reputable university in Central Vietnam with the participation of 64 preservice teachers attending a full-time teacher preparation program. The TPACK framework (Mishra & Koehler,2006) and the self-efficacy theory (Bandura,1986,1997) were used as theoretical foundation for examining how preservice teachers perceived their preparation for technology integration. The data collected through a survey as well as semi-structured interviews revealed an increase in the participants’ confidence regarding their abilities to integrate technology and their TPACK technology-related subdomains. The findings also suggested several ways to improve preservice teachers’ training for technology incorporation.
10: 20 - 10: 4525 mins
10: 20 - 10: 4525 mins
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314-PKok Yee Zhen
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Emerging technologies
Many studies have illustrated strong correlations between vocabulary knowledge and language proficiency level. As a method of motivating learners, educators may use games as a form of task-based learning to aid vocabulary learning. While existing studies focus on task-based vocabulary production, much less is known about vocabulary production in games. Furthermore, vocabulary learning and production is contingent upon the task or activity used. To address this, we investigated a lexical game as an elicitation task with 23 Year 6 multilingual ESL learners from an international school in Malaysia. An approximate measure of the Year 6 intact group’s language proficiency was obtained via the Vocabulary Levels Test and Lex30. Audio recordings of vocabulary elicited during the game were transcribed and quantified according to type, frequency and lexical richness. The number of low frequency words produced by individual participants was analysed using Lextutor. The findings show that participants with lower VLT and Lex30 scores produced fewer words above the 2,000-frequency band, compared to higher scoring participants. This exploratory study provided a systematic approach to generate and analyse productive vocabulary from lexical games, which was used for the development of a prototype Mobile lexical Game app.
10: 20 - 10: 4525 mins
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315-PAllen Chee
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
Traditional teacher-centered methods have often failed to provide sufficient opportunities for students to meaningfully engage with vocabulary learning and production. Taking cognizance of this shortcoming, this study examined the effects of using active learning strategies via Nearpod as a means to boost vocabulary learning among ESL learners in an international school in Malaysia. 23 students (Year 6A) from an intact group participated in the study. The main data elicitation instruments used were the pre- and post-tests and focus group interviews (FGI). Students learned and acquired targeted vocabulary through the use of the technological tool, which facilitated active learning strategies and activities over a period of 3 weeks. FGIs were used to probe students’ learning experiences. Findings revealed a significant increase in vocabulary acquisition and retention of the targeted words. Participants also gave favourable feedback towards the use of Nearpod, indicating the effectiveness of the technological tool to increase student engagement. These results demonstrate the impact of active learning strategies through the use of technological tools in improving vocabulary acquisition.
10: 20 - 10: 4525 mins
B10140 seats
316-PJunjie Gavin Wu
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
The value of peer feedback has been widely recognized in second language (L2) writing studies, however, not so much has been done in terms of speaking research. O n e important reason is the fact that many current language tests have not included it as a major component. Yet, when entering higher education, students are often evaluated based on their L2 speaking performance in various course assignments such as presentations and group discussions. To help learners with their speaking performance, the study made use of a new, free educational app that was specifically designed for speaking practice through peer feedback - PeerEval. Twenty-six Business s chool undergraduate students attended this study at a Hong Kong university. Qualitative data were gathered through a focus group interview and the teacher’s self-reflection journal. Students’ interview data a nd the teacher’s self-reflective data will be presented in relation to the affordances and constraints of this newly developed app and the project design. The presentation will end with pedagogical implications for classroom teachers regarding L2 speaking teaching.
10: 20 - 10: 4525 mins
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10: 20 - 10: 4525 mins
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318-PHa Pham
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)E-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
Realizing that the time for teaching and learning English at school is not enough for students to master a language; the author carried out an action research to overcome this obstacle. In the action research, a blended learning model consisting of the instructor’s training in class and an online program using a Learning Management System called Canvas as well as other applications of technology to the language classroom such as Quizizz, Flipgrid and Quizlet was applied in a high-quality class in the first term of 2018-2019 academic year. Students participated in a traditional class and enrolled in an online course to supplement their knowledge and skills. The findings, after a five-month research, showed that not only did such blended learning model increase the time for interaction between the instructor and her students but it also awakened and stimulated students’ interest in learning English. More importantly, students’ English proficiency improved markedly. As a result, the author is writing this article to address and discuss the effectiveness of this blended learning model in teaching and learning English and share with other educators the way she combined a traditional class with advanced education-supported tools in order to gain such significant achievement.
10: 55 - 11: 4550 mins
10: 55 - 11: 4550 mins
319-KEric Hagley
Keynote speechKeynote (50 minutes)Using the Internet for cultural exchange
The U. S. and E. U. governments now use the term “Virtual Exchange” (VE) to describe a situation where students in one class interact, under the guidance of their teachers, with students in other classes in geographically distant areas – usually foreign countries. VE has a relatively short history within English language teaching but is becoming more popular with a number of countries promoting it at national levels. Excellent examples of how it is being implemented around the world will be covered in this plenary. From these, research showing various outcomes has been forthcoming showing its benefits and how to overcome some of its shortcomings. However, what is clear is that students very quickly understand that through VE they have a clear and present necessity to use the language they are studying to learn with and about students in other countries. This in itself is a strong case for incorporating VE into all language classes but particularly communication classes. The presentation will conclude by offering participants a number of ways in which they can easily employ VE into their classes.
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11: 55 - 12: 2025 mins
11: 55 - 12: 2025 mins
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320-WMinh Nguyen
Individual sessionWorkshop (60 minutes)
Using digital tools to engage or assess the students is now more common in a modern classroom. However, besides adding fun to the class atmosphere, little is known about the improvements in student confidence, student achievement, and attitudes towards learning. This workshop reviews how teachers can use some popular online platforms like Quizlet, Quizizz, and Plickers as a guide to improve their instructions or meet the needs of the majority of the students. It also indicates how students can use these materials as a study tool to help them learn in an engaging and effective way. The students, as a result, could have fun repetitions in learning and in-the-moment feedback. This workshop aims at giving the participants an idea on how to transform their classes into an innovative and positive learning environment and providing support for anyone who wishes to use these applications later on.
11: 55 - 12: 2025 mins
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321-PDaniel Castañeda et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
In this pilot study, the researchers explored the students' experiences using a mobile application (Duolingo) when learning a second language. The research questions are: 1. What are the participants experiences using Duolingo when learning a second language? 2. How do students evaluate game-like activities with Duolingo? The mobile application activities were implemented for 6 out of 15 weeks outside the classroom. Seventeen English speakers learning Spanish participated in this study during the spring 2019 semester. They were undergraduate students enrolled in Elementary I and Elementary II Spanish courses at a US university. Preliminary descriptive and qualitative results indicate that learners liked the gaming features of the application and group competition outside the classroom. In this session, the presenters will also share with the audience the implementation of the activities and pedagogical implications for using this application as supplementary to classroom instruction.
11: 55 - 12: 2025 mins
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322-PVo Thuy Linh
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Mobile learning (M-learning) appears as the great break through of technology revolution 4.0. This has been popular in education over the world; however, it is still new learning approach for Vietnamese students among E-learning base. Evidently, the sharp development of mobile devices accompanied their smart functions is an advantage to apply for learning everywhere and every time. Thus, mobile assisted language learning (MALL) is able to support learners’ English learning, namely, for learners’ learning English at Sai Gon University (SGU). Although learning through smart and mobile devices is expected to apply on teaching and learning because of its conveniences, acceptance psychology to implement such learning approach need to be assessed seriously. This writing is to present the learners’ M-learning perception as well as their psychological preparation to perceive M-learning application at SGU through a survey on sixty EFL students at SGU with questionnaire as the research instruments included twenty five statements within thirty minutes. The survey is conducted in the second semester of the school year 2018-2019; it lasted one week. The quantitative approach is used to collect data which are analyzed by SPSS. The survey results indicate that students have positive perception towards English M-learning, and M-learning is expected to be applied strongly at SGU.
11: 55 - 12: 2025 mins
B10140 seats
323-PPhiphawin Srikrai
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Fostering autonomous learning through technology
Mobile learning (m-Learning) has been promoting throughout various disciplines, including language learning. M-learning has become an influencing tool for language learning from vocabulary learning, listening comprehension to reading. It makes language education as ubiquitous as possible. M-learning supports information learning, caters for powerful and unplanned ways of learning, and promotes sensibly personalized learning. Nevertheless, there are also concerns on the application of mobile-assisted language learning (MALL). For instance, the challenge of searching for suitable and effective methods to blend formal and informal learning, as seamless learning can occur anytime; in and out of classrooms, in formal settings, and the feeling of isolation, or separation bringing about opportunities for learners to work alone and isolated from other learners. In Thailand, m-learning is being employed in different fields of studies. M-learning has also gained popularity among policy makers, researchers, educators, and practitioners. When it is caught a lot of attention, before any teachers launch new ways of learning to students, it is better to understand whether students are ready for this yet. Despite expressing an interest towards MALL, students may not quite ready and uncertain about what MALL offers to help their learning process. This presentation, therefore, aims at offering the findings gathered on Thai students’ perceptions on MALL, and whether or not their current digital literacy matches this learning approach. The sampling groups are university students from three main fields of studies; sciences and technology, medical sciences, and humanities and social sciences. The questionnaire and semi-structure interviews are conducted. The findings are expected to be fruitful for both designing MALL environments and planning appropriate MALL pedagogical approaches for the context.
11: 55 - 12: 2025 mins
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324-PStewart Utley, Jasper Roe
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
Data-Driven Learning (DDL) has gained momentum as a pedagogic tool in the EFL context as increased accessibility to technology and software capabilities continue to reveal its potential. One such platform for this is the use of online corpora within language teaching. Whilst literature surrounding utilisation of corpora and concordancing software in the teaching of languages is increasing, focus on their usage within the scope of teaching writing skills remains undeveloped. Using the British Academic Written English Corpus (BAWE) accessed through the website lextutor. com and the platform Google Classroom, the project in focus details the development of an error highlighting and feedback system for academic writing which attempts to mitigate the restrictions and challenges previously found with using corpora pedagogically. The report presents the findings of a pilot study of the system with an upper-immediate Vietnamese high school class studying on an international programme, provides feedback from the students’ usage experience and puts forward recommendations for improvements and areas of further scholarly study on this topic.
11: 55 - 12: 2025 mins
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12: 30 - 12: 5525 mins
12: 30 - 12: 5525 mins
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325-PThuy Ngo
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Public Speaking is not only one of the skills that have to be mastered by English-major students in university but also an essential tool for communicating in various purposes especially making a presentation. In the classroom, improving this speaking ability has always been a concern because students are required to be efficient in language use and knowledgeable in structuring a persuasive speech. In the fast developing 21 st century, smartphones have played an important role supporting students’ academic activities. The research aims to apply smartphones in improving public speaking skill as well as some practical soft skills, like critical thinking skill, problem-solving skill and group-work. The students were divided into two groups, including a control group of 27 students and experimental group of 28 students. The results of the study indicate that smartphones connected with the Internet can help improve soft skills, background knowledge as well as take shape in students’ mind the habit of using English after school, which can enable them to keep on track of self-improvement to be well-prepared for career after graduation.
12: 30 - 12: 5525 mins
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326-PAzlin Zaiti Zainal
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
The potential of social media as a teaching and learning tool is increasingly being recognized by educators. A rationale for using social media is that it can transform teaching and learning and promote learner interaction and collaboration. However, currently there is limited understanding of how social media can be effectively utilized in formal educational settings. The aim of this study is to examine the use of language in social media communication in the Malaysian higher education context through a process-oriented perspective. More specifically, it aims to investigate how group discussions using social media contribute to knowledge building. In this study,15 university students were asked to write a summary in English based on a given task. Prior to this, they were given an article to read and discuss in groups using their chosen social media platform. Students’ online group discussions were thematically analyzed in order to examine how they organized their interaction in completing the given task. The findings provide some insights into the processes of communication and collective knowledge building through social media technologies and have implications on instructional task design.
12: 30 - 12: 5525 mins
B10140 seats
327-PYasuko Okada et al.
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Managing multimedia/hypermedia environments
In order to benefit from language learning at the university level, it is desirable for students to have undergone positive language learning experiences in junior high school (JHS) and senior high school (SHS). Previous studies have underscored the importance of motivating for language learning in JHS, suggesting that learners’ self-esteem may affect their experiences for language learning in higher education. Our study examined whether observing improvements in nonnative students motivated Japanese EFL learners who had either positive or negative previous learning histories. Specifically, we used two tools to achieve this goal: videos of performances of former students and visual demonstrations of changes in TOEIC scores of past students. Fifty-six college students participated in the study, and a questionnaire was conducted both before and after the videos and visual demonstrations. A cluster analysis identified two groups, according to experiences in language learning. Finally, statistical analysis indicated that each group scored higher in attitude and extrinsic elements after the demonstrations. The results confirmed that, regardless of students’ language learning experiences, these tools were useful and educational in developing positive attitudes and raising expectations for TOEIC preparation or speaking courses.
12: 30 - 12: 5525 mins
B10240 seats
328-PEric Hagley
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Virtual Exchange (VE) has quickly become an integral part of the modern language classroom. The U. S. and E. U. governments use the term to describe class to class interaction that occurs between geographically distant schools. These are generally in different countries. Students can use the language they are studying to interact with those in other countries thereby learning about other cultures whilst using the language in real-world communicative events. However, it would be a grave mistake to believe that you can simply put your students into a VE and all will be fine. For VE to be effective it is essential the teacher incorporate VE throughout their syllabi and curriculum. From simple classroom activities to final assessment, this presentation will outline a number of ways in which VE can be used to ensure the modern language classroom becomes a place where students understand the language they are learning is a tool for international communication and use it correspondingly.
12: 55 - 14: 1075 mins
12: 55 - 14: 1075 mins
A10140 seats
Day 3: Lunch
Refreshment
Enjoy a meal with fellow delegates in one of the local eateries.
A10140 seats
A10240 seats
A10330 seats
B10140 seats
B10240 seats
B10330 seats
14: 10 - 14: 3525 mins
14: 10 - 14: 3525 mins
A10140 seats
330-PCynthia White
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Fostering autonomous learning through technology
Online language teaching requires a radical shift in pedagogy and t eachers are challenged to transform themselves as they face new experiences and new ways of being a language teacher. While one-to-one language teaching (teacher-learner) is a widespread phenomenon which takes place in diverse settings (e. g. private tuition, home tutoring) relatively little attention has been given to the nature of synchronous one-to-one online teaching. In this talk I present results from two recent studies of one-to-one synchronous online language teaching via desktop audioconferencing or videoconferencing. The distinctive features of the one-to-one learning environments (e. g. personalised, accessible, multimodal, recordable) make them valuable sites for language learning and language teaching and also for research. The talk concludes with practical suggestions for one-to-one synchronous online language teaching as well as areas for future enquiry.
14: 10 - 14: 3525 mins
A10240 seats
331-PMatthew Cotter
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Using the Internet for cultural exchange
The International Indigenous Virtual Exchange (IIVE) project envisages to take the same positives of the International Virtual Exchange (IVE) outlined by Eric Hagley in the keynote speech, and apply them to indigenous groups around the world. The unique position of the presenter being of indigenous heritage himself (New Zealand Maori) and living in Hokkaido, home of the indigenous Ainu of Japan, provides the initial reasoning for the project. Indigenous classes are already being taught by the presenter he will show how CALL, specifically through the modified Moodle Forum, including reaction buttons for quick reader feedback and also an improved interface, can achieve the IIVE. Improvements should help with user 'buy-in' especially with the expected non technology savvy users. The main focuses of the project are to help indigenous support each other with language and cultural survival and revival, grievances and self-determination. The forum, quizzes and also knowledge and content sharing will start with Ainu and Maori and then move further afield to include other interested indigenous groups, particularly those in Australasia and Asia. Concluding the presentation in a discussion intends to draw feedback from participants and also find collaborators and contacts for the set up and running of the project.
14: 10 - 14: 3525 mins
A10330 seats
332-SEric Hagley et al.
Individual sessionSymposium (80 minutes)
Virtual Exchange (VE) can be a daunting process. "How does one find a partner? What platform can I use? What if something goes wrong - who will help? " These are the fears that are very real for the beginner VE practitioner. The International Virtual Exchange Project (IVEProject) was created to assuage some of those fears and to enable any language teacher to easily incorporate VE into their language classes. The IVEProject has had almost 15000 students and 200 teachers from 14 countries in South America, Asia, the Middle East, and Europe participating in a number of virtual exchanges over the last three years. Students interact asynchronously online in English as a lingua franca on a Moodle platform. This roundtable discussion brings together a number of teachers who have participated in the IVEProject to discuss the different ways they are using it in their classes, in addition to sharing their stories of how they got involved. Participants will outline its benefits as well as any problems they have with it. Participants will hear first-hand stories from beginner and "veteran" users of the IVEProject and will be able to decide if they wish to join it at some time in the future.
14: 10 - 14: 3525 mins
B10140 seats
333-PTruong My
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Training language teachers in e-learning environments
Online language training programmes have recently emerged as a promising professional development option for teachers of English as a second language (ESL) because of their relatively low cost, great flexibility, and easy access (England,2012). In several contexts including Vietnam, however, virtual learning environments still remain an unpopular choice among both school leaders and the teachers themselves (Ho, Nakamori, & Ho,2016). This qualitative study aims to shed lights on the situation through the lens of teachers’ attitudes – a psychological factor believed to significantly shape teachers’ participation in a professional development program (Day,1999). Responses to semi-structured interviews with 19 ESL teachers about their views of a particular online English language training course, and of online teacher training in general were transcribed verbatim and analysed to achieve this aim. The results showed a mixture of negative and positive viewpoints, and revealed a variety of interesting factors that may significantly affect ESL teachers’ choice of and engagement in e-learning environments for professional development. The conclusions are expected to be useful for many stakeholders, including teachers, e-program designers, and school leaders who wish to promote the online model of language teacher training among their ESL staff.
14: 10 - 14: 3525 mins
B10330 seats
14: 45 - 15: 1025 mins
14: 45 - 15: 1025 mins
A10140 seats
335-PNguyen Van Tuyen
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
It is obvious nowadays that computers still cannot replace human being. Nevertheless, in language teaching and learning, the utility of CALL is becoming indispensable for both teachers and learners. It is well-documented in the literature that there is no best teaching method for every culture of learning and teaching context. However, in each concrete teaching context, some methods are evidently more appropriate than others. The purpose of this research is to find out whether it is true that blended learning can bring about students’ not only new knowledge but also a change in their skills and attitude. The author of the paper conducted an experimental study on this by randomly selecting 169 participants to take part in the research. Each of them was provided with an account a Moodle platform to access blended courses of English integrated reading skills. Before the courses the participants were trained in handling Moodle platform and other online activities in combination with F2F learning. After they finished their courses, a survey was conducted in searching for the participants’ comparison of their experience of blended learning to traditional face to face methods. Then the data were analyzed with SPSS software. The findings of the research show that foreign language learners who are exposed to a blended learning environment derive more benefits in term of skills improvement and positive change in attitude towards their learning.
14: 45 - 15: 1025 mins
A10240 seats
336-PPham Thi Thanh Thuy
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
Internet has recently been considered popular among young adults, including learners of English. Naturally, to make use of the amazing technological tool, lecturers constantly become familiar to using and controlling such things as Gmail and Zalo in order to be closer to and keep in touch with learners. My research aims at clarifying current situation of using Gmail and Zalo for exchanging information between lecturers and learners of English at Hanoi National University of Education and benefits of these two tools in dealing with troubles arising during and after their cooperation. Additionally, efficient tactics are proposed to turn them into frequent and useful Internet apps for English lecturers and leaners’ comprehensive exchange of teaching and studying foreign languages. The researcher is going to directly interview and ask learners at HNUE to answer online questionnaires. As a result, data are collected, findings are discussed and implications for English teaching and learning will be suggested. To be specific, recommended activities for mutual reinforcement in collaboration between teachers and students are proposed at the end of the research paper for students' better results throughout the courses at university.
14: 45 - 15: 1025 mins
B10140 seats
337-PVan Le
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Film dubbing has emerged recently as one of the most effective language teaching techniques in teaching pronunciation. It utilizes authentic film clips, with which learners dub the voices of muted characteres. In contrast with the traditional approach to pronunciation teaching, the method of film dubbing not only offers a unique opportunity for the imitation of English pronunciation but also enhances students’ motivation in learning speaking process. In spite of the inspiration from film dubbing, not many studies offered empirical evaluation of the efficiecy of film dubbing projects in the EFL context. Therefore, this study aim ed to find out the reason why freshmen at Van Lang University (VLU) pronou n ced incomprehensibly, how film dubbing could help them to improve their utterances and whether they liked learning to speak in that way or not. Action research method was used in combi nation with various tools for data collection such as voice recording, observation and note-taking, questionnaire and interview in focus group. These methods also help ed to see more obviously how students made progress in pronunciation, overc a me presssure and shyness to pronounce words and how much they we re motivated by film dubbing activities. P roved successfully, film dubbing could help a lot of students, especially VLU students to improve their pronunciation and motivation, which gave them an essential background for further English communication.
15: 20 - 15: 4525 mins
15: 20 - 15: 4525 mins
A10140 seats
338-PQuy Nguyen
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Fostering autonomous learning through technology
Tutoring is a very important activity of teaching as it offers students opportunities to discuss the lecture contents and assessment or to debate on issues, concepts related to courses in order to consolidate their understanding. Traditionally, tutorial classes are held in a classroom and facilitated by a teacher or his teaching assistant (a tutor). Such traditional method of tutoring, however, has some drawbacks. This study investigates benefits of an alternative tutorial which is e-tutoring via internet such as chats with the lecturer on Facebook messenger, Zalo, Viber and email communication. Besides one 30-minute e-tutoring per week that the lecturer spends for each class on a time, students can send independent emails, messages to the lecturer at any time. A questionnaire survey was conducted to 215 students of different majors across the University of Foreign Language Studies in Danang. Participants were selected using the convenience sampling technique. The result indicates that most of them prefer communicating with the lecturer via internet to attending the tutorial in a classroom. Evidences indicates that e-tutoring is an effective method of supporting student learning and the adoption of e-tutoring stimulates the willingness to learn of students which then improve their understanding of lectures and expected-learning outcome.
15: 20 - 15: 4525 mins
A10240 seats
339-PPasi Puranen
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)
In this paper, I will present two different projects on digitalisation foreign language learning in Higher Education in Finland. The aim of the national, government-funded KiVAKO project (until 2021), is to create new multi-media online materials and a new e-learning and blended curriculum for the teaching and guidance of foreign languages. The project focuses on implementing flexible ways of study for less studied foreign languages. At the same time, the project will also focus on developing the (digi)pedagogical competences of language teachers. The other project,2DIGI, is a two-year project conducted by FINELC, the network of Finnish university language centers. This project was created after seeing a need in Finnish language centres to assist language teachers in their transition from an analogue world to a digital one. The focus is on how this transition can be managed pedagogically and offer teachers concrete help for themselves and their students. These projects focus on the development of the learning and teaching of languages and communication. The projects are a result of a substantial investment from the Finnish government, and the whole HE sector in Finland. There are altogether almost 100 teachers working together in building new digital learning paths in different languages.
15: 20 - 15: 4525 mins
B10140 seats
340-PMakimi Kano
Individual sessionPaper (25 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Since the spread of smartphones, dictionary use in classrooms has changed dramatically. Many studies have been done on the effectiveness of electronic dictionary use in EFL classrooms (Yanti,2016; Rezaei & Davoudi,2016), but recently, students choose to use online translation sites/apps, such as Google Translate or LINE Translation with their smartphones, rather than their electronic dictionaries when they write in English. There have been several studies about positive influences of the use of online translation sites on EFL students (Benda,2013; Groves & Mundt,2015), but without proper understanding of student search behavior, the use of these tools cannot be optimized. This pilot study aims to reveal students’ attitudes toward reference tool use in writing in English in EFL low-intermediate classrooms for first/second-year students in a private university in Japan. A survey is carried out to uncover a rationale for 40 students’ search behavior in the classes. In this study, we observe what kind of devices, websites, and/or apps they use to complete the assignment. Preliminary results suggest that students are highly dependent on smartphones during the writing assignments, and the fact that online translation sites/apps display only a single search result (whether appropriate for the context or not) seems to be the convenience they like. The survey results will then be discussed in light of creating instructional materials for the use of electronic dictionaries in the writing classroom.
15: 20 - 15: 4525 mins
B10240 seats
15: 45 - 16: 0015 mins
15: 45 - 16: 0015 mins
A10140 seats
Day 3: Afternoon refreshment break
Refreshment
Enjoy a break in the refreshment area.
16: 00 - 16: 5050 mins
16: 00 - 16: 5050 mins
Hall A300 seats
341-KKaren Price
Keynote speechKeynote (50 minutes)Emerging technologies
An ever-increasing number of software apps involve the use of artificial intelligence. These include bi-directional video technologies which enable learners to engage in two-way conversations with onscreen characters who can then react and respond to a learner’s replies and gestures. Other apps can detect when a learner is bored and provide more engaging content for that student. Still other apps can provide words correctly pronounced in the student’s own synthesized voice. And these are just a few! The goal of this talk is to provide an overview and critical analysis of emerging technologies relevant to CALL and promote reflection on the nature of meaningful uses of artificial intelligence in language learning. Through a variety of short video illustrations, this talk will provide a glimpse of some intriguing tools and apps. The hope is that participants will have a better sense of technology they may wish to use and where to find some of the free and lower-cost applications.
17: 00 - 17: 4040 mins
17: 00 - 17: 4040 mins
Hall A300 seats
342-KKeanwah Lee et al.
Keynote speechKeynote (50 minutes)Application of technology to the language classroom
Our plenary and featured speakers will comment on, and discuss, themes of the conference
17: 40 - 18: 0020 mins
17: 40 - 18: 0020 mins
A10140 seats
Day 3: Closing ceremony
Ceremonial event
Some final words of appreciation and a look ahead to next year.
Virtual Presentations
Online
Online
Online
Online

The virtual presentations at GLoCALL 2019 are viewable
from the main webpage for this conference:
https://glocall.org/course/view.php?id=31

402-VPramela Krish et al.
Individual sessionVirtual presentationApplication of technology to the language classroom
YouTube has the potential to be used as an instructional tool in line with current trends of collaboration and social networking in education. This study was conducted to investigate how YouTube helps students in the English Language course to complete their assignments. A total of 60 students participated in this study and the quantitative data was collected via a set of questionnaire while the qualitative data through an interview session with the students. This study revealed that YouTube was very beneficial for these students to complete their assignments. The findings also indicated some of the challenges students faced when using YouTube in completing assignments especially the authenticity of the channels and the need for the instructor’s presence in guiding them. Although most students in this study acknowledged the importance of the YouTube as another medium to complete their assignment, more measures must be taken by the instructors when assignments are set.
403-VNgoc Dieu Nguyen et al.
Individual sessionVirtual presentationUsing the Internet for cultural exchange
The study was conducted to evaluate how Skype in the Classroom could effectively facilitate cultural exchange and foster 21 st century skills among non-English majors. Based on the descriptions of 21 st century skills, students were required to do a range of activities such as research doing, presentation delivering, and quiz designing. A Likert scale survey and in-depth interviews were employed as the two main data collection tools. The results were very positive with an average of more than 80 percent of students perceiving themselves improving critical thinking skills, collaboration skills, communication skills, creativity and innovation skills, self-direction skills, global connection, local connections, and using technology as a tool for learning. The study confirms that even a low-resource classroom can carry out cultural exchange activities and students can benefit from such activities without leaving the classroom. Given that the context for this study was a large sized class with students of mixed abilities, some suggestions were given to enhance the effectiveness of using Skype in exchanging cultures and developing 21 st century skills.
404-VNguyen Huu Anh Vuong
Individual sessionVirtual presentationE-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
Recently, flipped classroom approach has received much attention from teachers of different subjects around the world. This new pedagogical model has been reported to be a potential method in the area of EFL teaching. In Viet Nam, teaching English grammar has mainly focused on students’ acquisition of grammar rules without much practical application in real communicative situations. This case study aims at investigating the affordances faced by students in a flipped English grammar class in order to help language teachers to harness the approach to enhance their students’ learning. Qualitative research design was adopted in the study. Thirty four students majoring in the English language at a university in Viet Nam attended a 10-week flipped grammar class. The instruments included the semi-structured interviews with ten students randomly selected from the participants. Thematic analysis was performed to address the qualitative data drawing on the Activity Theory framework. Twelve affordances of the flipped classroom approach in English grammar instruction such as being self-paced in learning, offering opportunities to voice opinions, saving time for in-class communicative activities and facilitating learning English grammar communicatively were identified. The results of the study offer valuable implications for the application of this model in teaching English as a foreign language, especially in the context of Viet Nam.
406-VVo Kim Anh, Pang Vincent
Individual sessionVirtual presentationApplication of technology to the language classroom
With the fast development of technology, the application of technology in education is becoming increasingly important. In English Teacher Competency Framework (ETCF) provided by Vietnamese Ministry of Education and Training, the ability to use technology in education is one important quality an English teacher must possess. As revealed from previous studies, English teachers’ ability to apply technology in education is weak as they are not provided sufficient chances to approach technology in education in their pre-service teacher education programs. The paper reports on part of a findings of a case study conducted in a Public University (a pseudonym) in Vietnam. The research adopted the qualitative approach with the in-depth interview as the instrument. Three experienced lecturers who also involved in designing the program and three student teachers were invited for the study. The research revealed that the program was not effective in educating student teachers how to use technology in teaching. Reasons for such inefficiency were the separation of “Technology in education” course from other methodological courses and the implementation of teaching practicum. Integrating technology in the curriculum and a stronger link between theories and practice in teaching practicum are suggested for developing students’ ability to apply technology in education.
408-VPham Nhu et al.
Individual sessionVirtual presentationApplication of technology to the language classroom
I CT Integration in Teaching English at Primary schools in Vietnam t hrough the Lens of SAMR Model The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the level of ICT integration in teaching English at primary schools in Vietnam through the lens of SAMR (Substitution, Augmentation, Modification and Redefinition model) by Puentedura (2012). In this case study,4 primary school teachers from 4 different provinces in Vietnam took part in this qualitative study to find out their extent of ICT integration in the process of using ICT in their teaching of speaking skills. Data collected from reflection notes, focus group interviews and observation notes were analysed in terms of different attributes of SAMR model. The results indicated that the level of ICT integration in teaching speaking skills at primary schools in Vietnam was mostly at the first stage of the SAMR model, i. e. Enhancement stage due to different reasons and factors. Lastly, the study suggested the recommendations to better the situation. Keywords: ICT integration, SAMR model, attributes, teaching English, suggestions
409-VChai Xun Yu
Individual sessionVirtual presentationE-learning, collaborative learning and blended learning
The 21st century education advocates providing students with multi-modal learning experiences alongside creating a path to autonomous learning. In this regard, mobile learning, or the M-learning is gaining popularity in the field of education. Today, its use in the area of teaching and learning is actively and widely explored especially in the higher education to encourage learning across contexts, subjects, and time through social and content interaction. The use of mobile apps in English language teaching is largely looking at how it impacts on students’ writing and speaking skills. Limited attention has been given to how the apps, particularly their asynchronous medium can support students’ collaborative learning. This paper examines the communication strategies used by postgraduate students, who are also in-service teachers, using the asynchronous WeChat mobile app for academic problem-solving purposes. It also explores their opinions on the practicality of using the oral asynchronous communication programme for problem-solving activities. This attempt is accomplished by employing a mixed-method approach where a quantitative frequency count of communication strategies used in the WeChat problem-solving activities is cross-referenced with retrospective interviews. The findings shed light on teaching and learning via oral-based asynchronous medium pertaining to the types of tasks and learning objectives to be achieved.
410-VKohnke Lucas
Individual sessionVirtual presentationFostering autonomous learning through technology
At higher education institutions, there is a major emphasis in language classes on building an academic and discipline-specific vocabulary sufficient to understand the literature discussed in class and to complete the assignments. Thus, insufficient vocabulary is one of the primary difficulties that students face in university-level language acquisition (Perin,2013). The problem is particularly acute in the context of specific disciplines, which are the core of individual students’ coursework (Kieffer, Petscher, Proctor, & Silverman,2016). In light of the importance of L2 vocabulary acquisition for students’ success in higher education the Excel@English PolyU mobile app was developed and employed at a university in Hong Kong. The app was developed with the aim of providing ESL/EFL students with vocabulary acquisition using an intuitive game-mood design (levels, leader board, social media integration) in which students complete challenges to expand their academic and discipline-specific vocabulary range. This paper will present the results of the effectiveness of Excel@EnglishPolyU (a non-commercial and freely available app) in enhancing students’ retention of discipline-specific vocabulary by analysing pre- and post-tests. The presentation will be beneficial for teachers interested in L2 vocabulary acquisition incorporating mobile/blended learning in higher institutions.
411-VAlvin Auh et al.
Individual sessionVirtual presentation
This is a comparative case study between a Malaysian and Vietnamese university. This study aims to investigate the best practices when teaching pre-service teachers how to incorporate technology during language teaching. The comparative study was done to investigate how the managers of both universities encouraged its teaching staff to use ICT to teach the pre-service teachers despite the lack of certain infrastructure. Vietnam was as a comparison with Malaysia for this study. This is due to the rapid growth of technology implementation in Vietnam’s education system. Furthermore, with both Malaysia and Vietnam having similar learning preference (Yang & Lin,2009), a comparison between both nations may yield more reliable findings. The administrator and lecturer of both universities were interviewed, using questions derived from the implementation staircase to ascertain what were the best practices implemented. The data collected indicated the use of certain regulatory methods that the managers of both universities used to encourage the use of ICT in the classroom. The regulatory methods while different, possess best practices that can be adapted to improve how ICT implementation in the classroom is taught to the teacher trainees.
Last modified: Wednesday, 7 August 2019, 6:03 AM